Himyarite


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Himyarite

a member of an ancient people of SW Arabia, sometimes regarded as including the Sabeans
References in periodicals archive ?
the reviewer's theory of the abandonment of the Himyarite capital afar and the termination of the art industry in the mid sixth (not fifth) century C.
The Syriac chronicle attributed to Dionysius of Tel-Mahre, written by a monk of Zuqnin in the late eighth century based on earlier historiographic sources, includes the following brief entry: "In 616 (305) the Himyarites were led to the faith of the Christians by a captive woman.
rcheologists also found a small stone statue of a headless woman in sitting position with two lines of Musnad script -used to write the ancient Himyarite language- on her chest, and some pieces of pottery.
However, Dhu-Nuwas's grandiose schemes received a serious setback when a neighboring sheikh named Aidug, who still adhered to heathenism, reproached the Himyarite king for destroying the Arabian Peninsula's trade by his exclusion of Byzantine merchants.
Take, for example, a recent attempt in which a Yemeni man tried to smuggle a set of silver coins dating back to the ancient Himyarite Kingdom, the last kingdom in Yemen before the arrival of Islam, dating from 110 BC to 527 AD.
Himyarite tribes appear first at the end of the last century BC in an inscription in the defences in the Wadi al-Bana which protected the entrance to Hadramawt from the port of Qani'.
A selection of 36 papers discuss such topics as the distribution of storage and diversion dams in the western mountains of South Arabia during the Himyarite period, American missionaries to Oman, a typology of incense burners of the Islamic period, relations between southern Arabia and the northern Horn of Africa during the last millennium BC, contemporary tribal versions of local history in Hadramawt, and lateral fricatives and lateral emphatics in southern Saudi Arabia and Mehri.
At the height of its power, the Himyarite kingdom dominated the entire Arabian Peninsula.
Yemen is familiar with federalism, dating back to ancient civilizations, from the days of Sheba and the Himyarite Kingdoms.
Christian Robin contributes a complete inventory of all Himyarite inscriptions of the period between the advent of monotheism at the end of the fourth and the sixth century AD when southern Arabian writing definitively disappears.
The 31 papers here discuss such topics as prehistoric camels at a new site in southeastern Arabia, a Himyarite model of water management illustrated by dams in the western mountains of Yemen, the village of Murwab in Qatar as an example of territory and settlement patterns during the ninth-century AD Abbasid period, the battle of Julfar in 880/1475, and an historical cartographic study of the Yabrin oasis in Saudi Arabia.
The book is well illustrated, with maps and full color images that help to craft a rich sense of the Himyarite kingdom.