Himyarite

(redirected from Himyarites)
Also found in: Dictionary.
Related to Himyarites: Minaean Kingdom

Himyarite

a member of an ancient people of SW Arabia, sometimes regarded as including the Sabeans
References in periodicals archive ?
Judaism had been adopted by the Himyarite upper class before the early fourth century AD through the prestige of Jerusalem and its omnipotent paternal god (Yule 2013a: 48).
As Christian Robin (2006) has observed, the Himyarite Age has, until recently, been poorly understood; its late pre-Islamic inhabitants being purportedly poor, isolated, illiterate, lacking a stable political system and living as nomads in the desert.
In Pseudo-Dionysius of Tel-Mahre's chronicle, the brief reference to the conversion of the Himyarites precedes rather than follows the Christianization of Axum; moreover, there is another substantial entry in between, also drawn from Socrates (HE 1.
Likely derived from the Book of the Himyarites, this passage is discussed by Irfan Shahid, Byzantium and the Arabs in the Fifth Century (Washington, D.
A farmer has discovered a water tunnel dating back to the Himyarite era or earlier in the Al-Zabal valley, Maifa'a, Ans, Dhamar.
The village of Hakr, for example, goes back to the Himyarite era.
Following his conversion to Judaism, Dhu-Nuwas assumed an additional Hebrew name -- Yussuf (Joseph), but Christian sources, notably the Syrian Boor of the Himyarites and The History of the Nestorians, give his name as Masrug.
The pagan tribesmen wanted no part of a campaign against the Himyarites.
The Himyarites existed at a fascinating time in terms of religion, as Arabia moved from solely indigenous polytheistic beliefs and monotheism began to be adopted.
The book is well illustrated, with maps and full color images that help to craft a rich sense of the Himyarite kingdom.
It is a veritable encyclopaedia of almost everything to do with Himyarite culture and its capital at Zafar.
The article discusses the chronology of the martyrdoms in Najran, especially the date of the martyrdoms during the reign of the Himyarite King Yusuf.