Hindustan

(redirected from Hindostan)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

Hindustan

(hĭn'do͝ostăn`) [Persian,=Hindu land], historical term, usually applied to the Ganges Plain of N India, between the Himalayas in the north and the Deccan plateau in the south. Used variably throughout Indian history—generally in contradistinction to the Deccan of peninsular India—it gradually came to mean the whole of N India from the Punjab to Assam. The term Hindustan has also been applied to the whole Indian subcontinent.

Hindustan

 

a loose designation for the whole of India or for northern India, as opposed to the Deccan. More narrowly, “Hindustan” refers to the region inhabited by speakers of Hindustani, an area that encompasses the Ganges River valley from the Delhi region to the Varanasi (Benares) region.

Hindustan

1. the land of the Hindus, esp India north of the Deccan and excluding Bengal
2. the general area around the Ganges where Hindi is the predominant language
3. the areas of India where Hinduism predominates, as contrasted with those areas where Islam predominates
References in periodicals archive ?
The Costume of Hindostan is on at the Annexe Art Gallery, India International Centre, Max Mueller Marg, till May 31 ( Thursday); 11 a.
The art, history, and geoscience of Hindostan whetstone gravestones in Indiana.
Emma Roberts mentions the scandal caused by eminent English performers playing Handel at a Durga Puja, Scenes and Characteristics of Hindostan, 2 vols (London: Allen, 1837), II, 360.
5) By picking Hindostan as his example, of course, Newman focuses on a territory where jurisdiction had recently been much at issue, for only beginning hi 1858 was India officially governed from London by a Secretary of State for India.
The portrait of John Lang I have used is based on the illustration (frontispiece in his book Travels in India and sketches of life in Hindostan.
Facts coming from afar made little impression," Alexander Dow reflects in The History of Hindostan (1768).
A flat-topped slab of sandstone bedrock about the size of a football field is exposed at low water just downstream from Hindostan Falls, Martin County, Indiana.
To disseminate the love of virtue and freedom, they cultivated the trans-Atlantic isles: and to rescue our nation from the hands of the oppressor, did this brave and generous people visit the shores of Hindostan.
Irish Classic winners Zionist (1925 Derby), Theresina (1930 Oaks), Dastur (1932 Derby), Turkhan (1940 Derby), Queen Of Shiraz (1940 Oaks), Majideh (1942 1,000 Guineas, Oaks), Claro (1946 2,000 Guineas), Nathoo (1948 Derby), Masaka (1948 Oaks), Hindostan (1949 Derby), Nashua (1952 1,000 Guineas), Noory (1953 Oaks)
Ernest Jones's The New World (1851), reprinted as The Revolt of Hindostan or the New World in the year of the Mutiny (1857), compares British colonial massacres with the ravages of famine in Ireland, celebrates women's political equality as a necessary attribute of "the new world," and interprets anti-European uprisings as signs of international proletarian revolution.
France Spain Italy Germany Poland Russia Sweden Turkey Arabia Palestine Persia Hindostan China Tartary Siberia Egypt Lybia Ethiopia Guinea Caffraria Negroland Morocco Congo Zaara Canada Greenland Carolina Mexico Peru Patagonia Amazonia Brazil.
In 1857 Jones reprinted The New World under the extended title The Revolt of Hindostan or the New World [15] in order to gain support for the anti-colonial uprising which had recently broken out in India.