Hippodamus

Hippodamus

(hĭpŏd`əməs), fl. 5th cent. B.C., Greek architect, b. Miletus. He was the first to plan cities according to geometric layouts. For Pericles he remodeled Piraeus (the port of Athens). He also planned (408) the city of Rhodes and went with the Athenian colonists to replan (c.440) the new city of Thurii in Italy. Other cities of the ancient world followed his methods.
References in classic literature ?
Diomed son of Tydeus slew them both and stripped them of their armour, while Ulysses killed Hippodamus and Hypeirochus.
So the Athenians, when they were founding their model new colony at Thurii, employed Hippodamus of Miletus, whom Aristotle mentions in Book II, as the best expert in town-planning, to plan the streets of the city, and Protagoras as the best expert in law-making, to give the city its laws.
1) One urbanism activity in Seleucid was establishing newly built cities and towns using Greek Style and Chess network of Hippodamus, which was mainly done to strengthen power and preserve Seleucid territory.
Fundamental properties of this method were city management in the form of self-governed city-states and designing of city roads according to chess network of Hippodamus.
From the unwritten laws of Lycurgus that created the foundations of the Spartan state, to the written laws of Solon in Athens, to Hippodamus on civic planning, Zaleucus on the divine source of laws, Philolaus on family laws and much more, Early Greek Lawgivers offers a fascinating glimpse into ideas and lives of notable figures in classical Greek history.
Later, in De militia, he had advocated a return to a classicall y inspired citizen militia based on a combination of elements derived from the military systems envisaged by Greek philosophers like Plato and Hippodamus and Romulus' Roman militia.
The city of Hippodamus was composed of 10,000 citizens divided into three parts--one of artisans, one of husbandmen, and a third of armed defenders of the state.
Aristotle criticizes Hippodamus for proposing an incoherent conception of political equality--full and equal citizenship but unequal rights to arms and land.
In criticizing the constitutional proposals of Hippodamus, Aristotle remarks:
The first name that crops up in this field is Hippodamus of Miletus, known as the father of town planning.
The Greek architect and city planner Hippodamus is reported to have originated the grid system that followed such an orientation.