hip

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hip,

in human anatomy, the joint separating the thigh bone from the pelvis, and the surrounding flesh. The adult hipbone consolidates three bones separate in youth: the ilium, ischium, and pubis. The two prominences commonly called the hipbones are the crests of the ilia. The bones of the buttocks that support the seated body are projections of the ischia. At the body midline, fibrous tissue bands the two pubis bones, thus stabilizing the hips and preventing them from spreading or buckling. With maturity, the ilium, ischium, and pubis meet and grow together at a Y-shaped junction, the site of the acetabulum, a deep cavity that receives the rounded head of the thighbone, or femur. The resulting ball-and-socket joint allows great latitude of thigh movement. If arthritis affects the joint to such degree that medication and other therapies cannot sufficiently reduce pain and increase mobility, the hip may be replaced surgically, using a metal ball and stem implanted in the top of the thigh bone and an artificial socket secured in the pelvis. See also pelvispelvis,
bony, basin-shaped structure that supports the organs of the lower abdomen. It receives the weight of the upper body and distributes it to the legs; it also forms the base for numerous muscle attachments.
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; legleg,
one of the paired limbs of an animal used for support of the body and for locomotion. Properly, the human leg is that portion of the extremity between the foot and the thigh. This section of the human leg contains two long bones, the tibia and the fibula.
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Hip

The external angle at the junction of two sloping roofs or sides of a roof: the rafter at the angle where two sloping roofs or sides of a roof meet.

hip

[hip]
(anatomy)
The region of the junction of thigh and trunk.
The hip joint, formed by articulation of the femur and hipbone.
(building construction)
The external angle formed by the junction of two sloping roofs or the sides of a roof.
A rafter that is positioned at the junction of two sloping roofs or the sides of a roof.
(civil engineering)

HIP

[hip or ¦āch¦ī′pē]
(engineering)

hip

hips, 1 (flush panel type)
1. The external angle at the junction of two sloping roofs or sides of a roof.
2. The rafter at the angle where two sloping roofs or sides of roofs meet.
3. The joint of a bridge truss where the top chord meets the inclined end post.

hip

1
1. either side of the body below the waist and above the thigh, overlying the lateral part of the pelvis and its articulation with the thighbones
2. another name for pelvis
3. short for hip joint
4. the angle formed where two sloping sides of a roof meet or where a sloping side meets a sloping end

hip

2
the berry-like brightly coloured fruit of a rose plant: a swollen receptacle, rich in vitamin C, containing several small hairy achenes
References in classic literature ?
and the clown crack- ing jokes behind him; and by and by all hands dropped the reins, and every lady put her knuckles on her hips and every gentleman folded his arms, and then how the horses did lean over and hump themselves
And this blessed gift of venerating love has been given to too many humble craftsmen since the world began for us to feel any surprise that it should have existed in the soul of a Methodist carpenter half a century ago, while there was yet a lingering after-glow from the time when Wesley and his fellow-labourer fed on the hips and haws of the Cornwall hedges, after exhausting limbs and lungs in carrying a divine message to the poor.
On gaining it, Kory-Kory, wading up to his hips in the water, carried me half way across, and deposited me on a smooth black stone which rose a few inches above the surface.
He bent backward and forward stiffly from the hips to get the kinks out of himself.
Here and there they met or were overtaken by the gaily dressed crowds of whole villages turning out to some local fair; the women, with their babes on their hips, walking behind the men, the older boys prancing on sticks of sugar-cane, dragging rude brass models of locomotives such as they sell for a halfpenny, or flashing the sun into the eyes of their betters from cheap toy mirrors.
Some might have thought Rose too large, her hips too rounded, the soft deep bosom too full, but Martin's eyes were approving.
But to stand working slowly in a field, and feel the creep of rain-water, first in legs and shoulders, then on hips and head, then at back, front, and sides, and yet to work on till the leaden light diminishes and marks that the sun is down, demands a distinct modicum of stoicism, even of valour.
Bagnet as if he had no power of bending himself, except at the hips, for that purpose.
Here were the great males towering in all the majesty of their imposing height; here were the gleaming white tusks protruding from their massive lower jaws to a point near the centre of their foreheads, the laterally placed, protruding eyes with which they could look forward or backward, or to either side without turning their heads, here the strange antennae-like ears rising from the tops of their foreheads; and the additional pair of arms extending from midway between the shoulders and the hips.
One could see, by the way in which her girdle rose above her hips, that she had not been long in Paris.
She was tall and thin, with narrow hips and the chest of a boy.
All wore strange protruding girdles of dried grass about their hips and many were loaded with brass and copper anklets, armlets and bracelets.