Hispaniola

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Hispaniola

(hĭs'pănyō`lə), Span. Española (ĕspänyō`lä), second largest island of the West Indies, 29,530 sq mi (76,483 sq km), between Cuba and Puerto Rico. HaitiHaiti
, Fr. Haïti , officially Republic of Haiti, republic (2005 est. pop. 8,122,000), 10,700 sq mi (27,713 sq km), West Indies, on the western third of the island of Hispaniola.
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 occupies the western third of the island and the Dominican RepublicDominican Republic
, republic (2005 est. pop. 8,950,000), 18,700 sq mi (48,442 sq km), West Indies, on the eastern two thirds of the island of Hispaniola. The capital and largest city is Santo Domingo.
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 the remainder. Visited by Columbus in 1492, the island was called Española. The later French colony was called Saint-Domingue, after Santo Domingo, the Spanish colony in the eastern part of the island. The terrain, dominated by the Cordillera Central, is high and rugged; Pico Duarte (10,417 ft/3,175 m high) is the tallest peak. Extending far westward, like the claws of a crab, two mountain ranges form the scenic Gulf of Gonaïves. The island's climate is subtropical, and agriculture (coffee, cocoa, sugarcane, and tobacco) flourishes in the abundant rainfall. In some areas of the island (in Haiti especially), increased population has caused significant deforestation for cultivation. Port-au-Prince, Haiti, and Santo Domingo, the Dominican Republic, are the largest cities.

Hispaniola

the second largest island in the Caribbean, in the Greater Antilles: divided politically into Haiti and the Dominican Republic; discovered in 1492 by Christopher Columbus, who named it La Isla Española. Area: 18 703 sq. km (29 418 sq. miles)
References in periodicals archive ?
23) For the island of Hispanola see Eric Williams, Columbus to Castro: The History of the Caribbean, (New York 1984), chapter Four.
Haitian forces helped to liberate the other half of the island of Hispanola from the Spanish, setting the stage for the emergence of the Dominican Republic as an independent nation.
Many different African ethnic groups crossed paths on the island of Hispanola (known now as Haiti and the Dominican Republic) when brought there as slaves by the French centuries ago.
On his first voyage, in 1492, he landed in the Bahamas and then explored Cuba and Hispanola (Haiti and the Dominican Republic).
Ironically, his next overseas posting after Upper Canada was to the French part of Hispanola (Haiti), where he was to put down a slave uprising.
Stephanie Jed, for example, casts her discerning eye on the diplomatic prose of Milan, the economic and cultural transactions between Hispanola and Venice, and the marginalia of an Este military servant to show that the chivalric romance held not only a power over the imagination of kings and soldiers, but also formed a "system of particular social relations .
Columbus arrived on the Santa Maria on the north coast of the island of Hispanola (now shared by the Dominican Republic and Haiti) in 1492.