philosophy of history

(redirected from Historiosophy)

philosophy of history

  1. critical and methodological reflection on the nature of HISTORY and HISTORIOGRAPHY.
  2. large-scale speculative historical theories, claiming general laws or asserting general tendencies seen as operating throughout history. The philosophy of history in this second sense, influential especially in the 18th- and 19th-centuries (e.g. HEGEL), has on the whole gone out of fashion in the 20th-century See also HISTORICISM, GRAND NARRATIVE AND METANARRATIVE.
References in periodicals archive ?
but for various reasons, explained by the nature of the sages' historiosophy, they adopted an alternative, albeit wrong, periodization.
Rabbi Kook and His Sources: From Kabbalistic Historiosophy to National Mysticism," in Studies in Modern Religions, Religious Movements and the Babi-Baha'i Faiths, ed.
Mikhailovsky's interpretation of the historiosophy in War and Peace and Tolstoy's article "Progress and the Definition of Education.
Rudnytskyi's claims met with approval from the practitioners and amateurs of racial anthropology in Germany primarily because they perfectly suited a particular racial historiosophy which enjoyed huge popularity at the time.
Let us then take a closer look at the origins of this thesis from Adorno's stance: in Hegel's historiosophy the spirit through the negation of negation--negation of the primal difference--absorbs the different--nature.
The section on historiosophy and philosophy has contributions by Louis H.
Summing up, first we compare the importance of lay beliefs about history and examine their structure as indicators of a general lay historiosophy, as well as their association with willingness to fight in a new war.
One should anticipate similarities because, as McCalla points out in A Romantic Historiosophy, Ballanche greatly influenced the early French Romantic movement for which Hugo served, in the eyes of some contemporaries, as the de facto leader.
Contributors present interpretations of the Hebrew Bible, New Testament, and the rabbinic literature; inter-faith dialogues (including Islam); reflections on Judaism as historiosophy, Jewish studies in Germany, and current US public school Holocaust education; and the relationship between Zionism and Hebrew studies.
The final piece in the Studer/Haumann volume is an article byJutta Scherrer ("The Place of 'Socialism-Communism' in Recent Textbooks of History and Cultural Studies" [in German]) on the curious post-Soviet disciplines of historiosophy (istoriosofiia) and culturology (kul'turolagiia).
This tragedy, in characteristic biblical historiosophy, is interpreted as the wages of irredeemable sins committed by the Judeans.
His reconfiguration of Judaism and Christianity appears to be a mirror image of the Augustinian dualistic historiosophy based on the categories of the "City of God" and "City of Man.