History Workshop Journal


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History Workshop Journal

a radical socialist and feminist journal and collective founded in the early 1970s. It has been especially associated with ‘new ways’ of doing and presenting historical research, e.g. ‘history from below ’ (an emphasis on social history and the history of everyday life and ordinary people, including ORAL HISTORY), an emphasis on interdisciplinarity, and on writing in ways accessible to a wide readership.
References in periodicals archive ?
Beginning in Spring 1982, the History Workshop Journal presented itself as a "Journal of Socialist and Feminist Historians.
Radical America ceased publishing in the 1990s (Radical History Review continues, though, like Social History, it has published very few articles on labour or working-class history over the past five years), and the History Workshop Journal, which printed many left-leaning labour historians throughout the 1970s and 80s, no longer calls itself either a socialist or feminist journal.
64) Counter Cultures, which included one chapter previously published in Radical America, represents the best tradition of the groundbreaking scholarship encouraged by the feminist-socialists who shaped the editorial flavor of History Workshop Journal in the early 1980s.
Bell (1850-51)," History Workshop Journal, 6 (April 1979), 126-131.
53) See for instance, Hera Cook, 'The English Sexual Revolution: Technology and Social Change', History Workshop Journal, 59 No.
54) Valeria Babini, 'Science, Feminism and Education: The Early Work of Maria Montessori', History Workshop Journal, 49 (200o): 44-67; Sandra Holton, 'Gender Difference, National Identity and Professing History: The Case of Alice Stopford Green', History Workshop Journal, 53 (2002): 118-127; Mary Chamberlain, 'Elsa Goveia: History and Nation', History Workshop Journal 58, No.
55) See James Hinton, '"The Tale of Sammy Spree": Gender and the Secret Dynamics of 1940s British Corporatism', History Workshop Journal, 58 (2004): 86-109; and David Hopkin, 'Female Soldiers and the Battle of the Sexes in France: The Mobilization of a Folk Motif, History Workshop Journal, 56 (2003): 78-104.
56) See Patricia Crawford, 'Women's Dreams in Early Modern England', History Workshop Journal, 49 (2000): 129-141; and Karen Harvey, 'A Place Called Sex: Gender, Space and Modernity in Eighteenth-century England', History Workshop Journal 51 (200l): 158-179.
7-16; "History, the Nation and the Schools," History Workshop Journal 29 (1990), pp.
Clark's contribution to the History Workshop Journal symposium reflects the obsession with national identity especially strongly from the Right.

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