human leukocyte antigen

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Related to Hla antigens: Graft versus host disease

human leukocyte antigen

[¦yü·mən ¦lü·kə‚sīt ′ant·i·jən]
(immunology)
Any of a group of antigens present on the surface of nucleated body cells that are coded for by the major histocompatibility complex of humans and thus allow the immune system to distinguish self and nonself. Abbreviated HLA.
References in periodicals archive ?
There are several reports in literature linking HLA antigens and sarcoidosis, which is a granulomatous disease of unknown etiology.
Table 1 Sample HLA typing test results Mother HLA-A2, A11; B35, B62 Cultured fetal cells HLA-A2, A11; B35, B51 Obligate paternal HLA-A2 or 11; B51 (not found HLA antigens in mother)
Three pairs of HLA antigens are compared between donor and patient.
Hashimoto H, Nishimura Y, Dong RP, et al: HLA antigens in Japanese patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.
The conventional way to test for tissue compatibility is to obtain a blood sample and test it against a set of antibodies that react to HLA antigens.
Several HLA antigens are associated with various diseases, and probably the strongest association known is that between the HLA-B27 antigen and rheumatic diseases such as ankylosing spondylitis (also known as Bechterew disease), Reiter syndrome, and acute anterior uveitis [1].
Physicians have known for years that apatient with HLA antibodies specific to a donor's HLA antigens is much more likely to reject that donor's transplanted organ.
In conjunction with the Diego screening study, we plan to begin HLA typing to correlate disease to various HLA antigens.
A clinical study demonstrated high correlation and superior reproducibility when CROSS-STAT was compared to microlymphocytotoxicity for detection of donor specific antibodies to recipient HLA antigens.
1 Part 1 - gradual delivery of diagnostic kits for the study of class I HLA antigens (locus A, B, C) and class II (DR and DQ locus) at a low resolution by SSP.
The cells are readily available in cord blood banks, are routinely typed for HLA antigens and ABO blood groups, and are tested for infectious agents," she said.
Dausset's discovery and continued work with the HLA antigens has permitted physicians to select organ donors by matching as closely as possible the HLA molecules of donor and recipient to reduce the risk of graft rejection.