oboe

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oboe

(ō`bō, ō`boi) [Ital., from Fr. hautbois] or

hautboy

(ō`boi, hō`–), woodwind instrument of conical bore, its mouthpiece having a double reed. The instruments possessing these general characteristics may be referred to as the oboe family, which includes the English hornEnglish horn,
musical instrument, the alto of the oboe family, pitched a fifth lower than the oboe and treated as a transposing instrument. It has a pear-shaped bell, giving it a soft, melancholy tone.
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, the bassoonbassoon
, double-reed woodwind instrument that plays in the bass and tenor registers. Its 8-ft (2.4-m) conical tube is bent double, the instrument thus being about 4 ft (1.2 m) high. It evolved from earlier double-reed instruments in the 16th cent.
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, and the contrabassooncontrabassoon,
large, deep-toned instrument of the oboe family, also called double bassoon. Its tube, over 16 ft (5 m) long, is doubled upon itself four times. It was first made by Hans Schreiber of Berlin in 1620.
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 or double bassoon. The oboe was developed in the mid-17th cent. in France from various older double-reed instruments, which the oboe, with its greater expressive and dynamic range, largely displaced by the 18th cent. It was soon used in the orchestra, possibly as early as 1657, and was the principal orchestral woodwind throughout most of the 18th cent., the flute and clarinet gaining an equal footing only late in the century. It was also a favorite solo instrument, and it has an extensive solo and chamber-music literature from the baroque and early classical periods. In the 19th cent., although retaining its importance in the orchestra, it was rarely employed for solo purposes. In the 20th cent. its solo use has increased. It was gradually improved mechanically, notably in the 19th cent., and the Conservatory model, developed in France, is most used now. The oboe d'amore, pitched a minor third lower than the oboe, was much used in the baroque era, especially by J. S. Bach. It fell into disuse thereafter, but has been revived in the 20th cent. Its tone is less brilliant than that of the oboe. The oboe da caccia is an early version of the English horn, pitched a fifth lower than the oboe and therefore a transposing instrument. Oboes of this size were known by 1665, and Purcell scored for one in his Dioclesian (1691). A curved form, often with the present instrument's characteristic bulbous bell, appeared in the 18th cent. and was employed occasionally by Bach, Haydn, and Mozart. See also shawmshawm
, double-reed woodwind instrument used in Europe from the 13th through the 17th cent. The term denotes a family of instruments of different sizes. The shape and tone of the soprano shawm are comparable to those of the oboe, of which it is a precursor.
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Oboe

 

a reed woodwind musical instrument. It originated in France in the second half of the 17th century from an instrument of the Middle Ages, the shawm (Schalmei).

The modern oboe is a straight wooden pipe consisting of a top joint, a middle joint, and a bell. It has 25 holes, of which 22-24 are covered by keys. The instrument uses a double reed made from a special type of cane. Two systems of oboes exist—German and French. The oboe of the French system, which has a better key construction and is distinguished by the purity of its intonation, is widespread; its sound is piercing, with a nasal timbre. The oboe occupies an important place among the woodwind instruments used in symphonic and operatic orchestras. It is also used as a solo and ensemble instrument. Types of oboes include the tenor oboe, or English horn; and the alto oboe, or oboe d’amore.

S. IA. LEVIN

Oboe

[′ō‚bō]
(navigation)
An electronic navigation system utilizing a single-path round-trip system for determination of transmission times and distance; used for bombing in World War II.

oboe

a woodwind instrument of the family that includes the bassoon and cor anglais, consisting of a conical tube fitted with a mouthpiece having a double reed. It has a penetrating nasal tone. Range: about two octaves plus a sixth upwards from B flat below middle C
References in periodicals archive ?
HIGH HOPES: The Great Northwestern Hoboes have a single coming out
The men, women, and children variously called bindlestiffs, fruit tramps, bums, and hoboes were vital to the creation of the West and its economy, yet their history has been largely untold.
Many of the hoboes in the Depression were veterans of World War I.
1) Unlike Grant's nomads, however, who include lost conquistadors, mountain men, cowboys, Indians, hoboes, and bullriders, among others, and all of whom seem to prefer their proud, uncompromising solitude to the less-than-ideal accommodation of everyday life, Haruf's rebellious spirits find themselves tamed, even amidst the physical isolation of the great Western plains, by the redemptive force of an enduring civilization.
In those early days during the Depression, hoboes used to come by seeking food.
This rootlessness and accompanying rage are explained in several ways: imitation of transients and professional hoboes, rejection of McEachern's Protestant orderliness, the product of Joe's tortured sexuality and contradictory racial identity.
The titles tell all: Coyotes: A Journey Through the Secret World of America's Illegal Aliens and Rolling Nowhere: Riding the Rails With America's Hoboes.
Today's homeless people are diverse, and they differ from the traditional so-called "Skid Row bums" and hoboes who rode the rails.
We were both hoboes leading raffish lives," he said, "loving the theater, which didn't love us back, failing frequently but persisting.
Grant, Richard 2003 American nomads: Travels with lost conquistadors, mountain men, cowboys, Indians, hoboes, truckers, and bullriders.
HEAVENS FALL," from the United States, is based on the true story of the 1933 Scottsboro retrial of nine black hoboes accused of assaulting two white women on a train in Alabama.