Hochhuth


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Hochhuth

Rolf . born 1933, Swiss dramatist. His best-known works are the controversial documentary drama The Representative (1963), on the papacy's attitude to the Jews in World War II, Soldiers (1967), German Love Story (1980), and Wessis in Weimar (1992)
References in periodicals archive ?
Basada en la obra teatral El vicario de Rolf Hochhuth, esta cinta narra la historia de dos cristianos que luchan contra la indiferencia del Vaticano (y del mundo) ante el exterminio judio perpetrado por los nazis.
Hochhuth alleged that the wartime pope was a self-interested coward who was silent and inactive during the Holocaust.
As for Hochhuth, Burleigh writes, "Five years after his death, Pius would become the object of Communist-inspired denigration in the form of Rolf Hochhuth's historically fanciful .
The episode caused a playwright called Rolf Hochhuth to write a play called Soldiers in 1967 based on the Sikorski tragedy and staged in 1968 in London, and David Irving wrote a book called Accident?
German novelist Rolf Hochhuth said yesterday: "He deserves a memorial because he nearly rid the world of this evil man.
German novelist Rolf Hochhuth said: "Elser is an undervalued figure, a model of courage.
A series of observers including the Swiss playwright Rolf Hochhuth and the German political philosopher Hannah Arendt subsequently posed the same question.
Birgit Haas's chapter on Wendedramen has useful things to say about the reasons for the relative lack of interest in theatre since 1990 but is less original in its scrutiny of motifs of colonization, the wrecked marriage between east and west, and the Stasi in dramas by Manfred Karge, Botho Strauss, Volker Braun, Rolf Hochhuth, Lutz Rathenow, and Christoph Hein.
Also the Pope's relative silence in regard to the persecution of the Jews disturbed Jacques Maritain already in 1946 and troubled many Christians and Jews after 1963, when Rolf Hochhuth published his play, The Deputy.
The critic Kenneth Tynan, chief cheerleader for the new playwrights, imported translations of the work of the German playwright Rolf Hochhuth, including a play, Soldiers, suggesting that Churchill was a war criminal for bombing German cities and, further, that he had conspired to murder the Polish General Sikorsky during the war.
Add to this list the Vatican's own twelve volume rejoinder to Hochhuth, published as Actes et documents du Saint Siege relatifs alas seconde guerre mondiale, condensed by Pierre Blet (1999), and the material on the subject becomes quite formidable.
Lawler points out that Hochhuth had written another play, now relatively unknown, "The Soldiers," in which the Anglican Bishop Bell, concerned with the slaughter of non-combatants, tries in vain to persuade Churchill to stop the Allied saturation bombing--specifically the bombing of Dresden, a refuge for children as well as the aged and infirm, which was destroyed a few months before the end of the war.