holdfast

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holdfast

[′hōl‚fast]
(botany)
A suckerlike base which attaches the thallus of certain algae to the support.
A disklike terminal structure on the tendrils of various plants used for attachment to a flat surface.
(invertebrate zoology)
An organ by which parasites such as tapeworms attach themselves to the host.

holdfast

A device for securing anything in its place, as a hook, bolt, spike, etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
hemiphyllum; forming an algal bed from spring to early summer, with only remnant holdfasts present in other seasons), (5) a mixture of (1) and (2), (6) a mixture of (1) and (3), and (7) no macroalgal bed (no perennial Laminariales or Sargassaceae).
Similarity between seahorse and holdfast color was verified by a waterproof table containing a color pattern scale of colors found in available holdfasts and seahorses made specifically for this study.
This type of fossil usually has a long and narrow but flexible, gently tapering tube with a cup-like attachment disc, or holdfast, at the pointed end, which once anchored the organism to the sea floor, or to a hard surface such as a shell or another Sphenothallus.
Glenognatha emertoni mating behavior was unique in having a vibratory phase of courtship that was absent in its congeners, but otherwise was similar to that of other tetragnathines in using chelicerae as holdfasts during mating (Barrows 1919; LeSar & Unzicker 1978; Huber 1998; West & Toft 1999; Danielson-Francois 2002; Danielson-Francois & Bukowski 2005).
The spiny grazers nibble on the kelp holdfasts, or the strands that anchor the seaweed to the seafloor.
Holes for dogs and holdfasts are spaced randomly about 1-1/2" apart across one half of my bench.
For example, tail injuries are likely a serious wound for seahorses, given that their tails are essential to grasp holdfasts and may play a key role in mating competition, as they do with Hippocampus fuscus (Vincent, 1994).
1), several specimens of this small (2-6 mm disk diameter), six-armed brittle star were collected from the rhizomatous holdfasts of the intertidal (+0.
As algae-eaters, urchins feed on the holdfasts of the kelp, resulting in a sea floor completely devoid of vegetation.