devolution

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devolution

Politics a transfer or allocation of authority, esp from a central government to regional governments or particular interests
References in periodicals archive ?
10) Many of the early home-rule provisions did not delegate plenary
Addison is a home-rule community in sound financial condition.
Moore, D-Millbury, said he would need to consult the Legislature's legal counsel to see whether the home-rule petition, if passed by selectmen, could be amended before consideration by the House and Senate or whether it would have to be amended at spring town meeting.
As a home-rule city, Bloomington has no statutory debt limit.
MILLBURY -- A week after selectmen voted to schedule a special town meeting to consider a home-rule petition to allow special police officers to work beyond age 65, they reversed themselves at a meeting Tuesday.
The village, a home-rule municipality, has grown to an estimated 37,800 residents in 2005 from 31,196 in 1990 as new residential developments attracted a young and increasingly affluent population.
The only exception is for a city or town to seek a home-rule petition from the Legislature and governor to get around it, usually for very specific terms.
While the town of Normal is a home-rule municipality and not bound by tax rate limitations, its strong financial results reflect its diverse economy and conservative financial management.
Selectmen voted 3-1-1, with Selectman Francis King, board chairman, recusing himself and Selectman Brian Ashmankas opposed, to schedule a special meeting to vote on petitioning the Legislature and the governor for a home-rule exemption to the state's mandatory retirement age of 65 for public safety officers.
Patrick and legislative leaders recently put the kibosh on two home-rule petitions the city had filed that would have enabled it to redirect $6.
Hard on the heels of the state's rejection of two home-rule petitions that the city had counted on to help balance its books in 2010, came word that Worcester was not among 13 Massachusetts communities sharing some $29 million in Community Oriented Policing Services grants doled out by the U.