Homeric Hymns


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Homeric Hymns

(hōmĕr`ĭk), name applied to a body of 34 hexameter poems falsely attributed to HomerHomer,
principal figure of ancient Greek literature; the first European poet. Works, Life, and Legends

Two epic poems are attributed to Homer, the Iliad and the Odyssey.
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 by the ancients. Composed probably between 800 and 300 B.C., they are complimentary verses addressed to the various gods, such as Aphrodite, Apollo, Demeter, and Hermes. Although sometimes of great beauty, they are important mainly as prime sources for information about Greek religion and cults. The Margites (7th or 6th cent. B.C.), a comic poem, and The Battle of the Frogs and Mice (5th–2d cent. B.C.), a mock epic, were also incorrectly attributed to Homer.
References in periodicals archive ?
English text by John Ashbery; ancient Greek text from Plato, Hes-iod, Aeschylus, Euripedes, Mimnermus, Archilochus, Sappho, Homer, lbycus, and the Homeric hymns.
Rather than dryly summarizing the attributes of and myths relating to each divinity and hero, the author offers excerpts from the Iliad, Odyssey, and Homeric Hymns themselves.
of Heidelberg, Germany) begins with a summary of the poem, which is the longest of the Homeric Hymns.
While it contains, in addition to all the texts attributed to Homer at the time--the Homeric Hymns and the Battle of the Frogs and Mice as well as the Iliad and the Odyssey--the lives of Homer thought to be by Herodotus and Plutarch, and an essay by Dio Chrysostom, there is barely a word of explanation in Latin other than an epistle by the editor Bernardo Nerlio to Piero de' Medici.
The book proceeds chronologically, beginning with Hesiod, Homer, and the major Homeric Hymns.
A sexual conservatism also creeps into Shelley's translations of the Homeric Hymns and Plato's Symposium.
3), although one might be tempted simply to call it a hymn built on a mythological tale, not unlike the Homeric hymns.
Each essay focuses on a particular author with the exception of one on the Homeric hymns.
In the Apolline poem of the Homeric Hymns Leto felt the pangs of birth, "so she cast her arms about a palm tree and kneeled on the soft meadow while the earth laughed for joy beneath.
His familiarity with classical hymn is confirmed by his translations of the Homeric Hymns, begun roughly a year after the composition of the "Hymn to Intellectual Beauty.
The book under review uses particularly the Homeric Hymns, though Hesiod and other Greek sources are drawn upon as appropriate.
18) It is interesting to note, for instance, that the term kikus (translated here as "might"), is used in The Homeric Hymn to Aphrodite (its only other known attestation) to characterize the "deficient" condition of Tithonus, the unfortunate paramour of the Dawn, who, being granted eternal life without eternal youth, experiences the most extreme condition of senescence: "His voice drones on [literally "flows"] limitlessly, nor is any kikus his, such as was previously in his supple limbs" (Homeric Hymns, 6.