hominid

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hominid

any primate of the family Hominidae, which includes modern man (Homo sapiens) and the extinct precursors of man

hominid

[′häm·ə·nid]
(anthropology)
Any of the bipedal primates of the family Hominidae (modern or extinct); contains the genera Ardipithecus, Australopithecus, and Homo.
References in periodicals archive ?
One of the most controversial proposed members of the human evolutionary family, considered an ancient ape by some skeptical scientists, is the real hominid deal, an analysis of a newly reconstructed skull base finds.
As in gorillas, Ardi and the newly discovered hominid possessed short, curving big toes capable of grasping against the second toe.
4 Myr hominid Ardipithecus ramidus and its slightly earlier African relatives.
However, a closer look at the Bulgarian pre-human hominid molar revealed that the ape had eaten hard, abrasive objects such as grasses, seeds and nuts.
This is where Archaeologists found the skull, mandible, pelvis, and leg bones of a tiny female hominid, a newly discovered relative of our ancestors in the sediments of a large limestone cave called Liang Bua.
The latest findings may put the origin of hominids back by one million years, as the oldest hominid fossil hitherto was Orrorin tugenensis discovered in Kenya, which is estimated to be six million years old.
Five million years later the first reliable records of hominids, creatures which are more human than ape, appear.
The aim of the West Turkana Archaeological Project is to discover traces of early hominids, particularly stone tools, preserved in fossil sediments of earlier lake shores in the same area.
Paleontologists will not be able to identify the species of this hominid, or human forerunner, until all the bones are removed from the rock layers where they are embedded in the Sterkfontein cave, the site of many discoveries of early-human remains.
These hominids will be important in terms of understanding the early phases of human evolution before Lucy.
The hominid remains were recovered in November 2013 and March 2014, shortly after two cave explorers discovered the fossils and alerted Berger.
Margvelashvili said that Dmanisi hominids show the first clear case of overusing the toothpick, which led to infection.