homoplasy

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homoplasy

[′hä·mə‚plā·sē]
(biology)
Correspondence between organs or structures in different organisms acquired as a result of evolutionary convergence or of parallel evolution.
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About half of the suspected MCs may result from homoplasies in non-synonymous positions and in other slow evolving third codon positions.
There are no homoplasies in tarsal scopula evolution in the second cladogram.
A combined phylogenetic analysis of morphological characters and mitochondrial DNA sequencing data by our team confirmed the hypothesis that certain conchological characters (G-type clausilium apparatus, Gittenberger and Schilthuizen 1996) are actually homoplasies and, [TABULAR DATA FOR TABLE 1 OMITTED] thus, do not contain any intergeneric phylogenetic information (Douris et al.
Evolutionary history of the fish genus Astyanax Baird & Girard (1854) (Actynopterigii, Characidae) in Mesoamerica reveals multiple morphological homoplasies.
TABULAR DATA FOR TABLE 1 OMITTED] If feeding larvae could be lost and regained in some lineages, by convergent atavisms of many traits, then homoplasies in feeding larval morphology should be common (Strathmann and Eernisse 1994), but such homoplasies are not known for any starfish.
When homoplasies have arisen from common functional demands (by convergence or parallelism), then spatial or temporal variation in those demands could also select for similarities in the plastic expression of those traits (Hodin, 2000; Meinzer, 2003).
The variation in the SSTs conformed to the clonal model for bacterial population structure (28), and the maximum parsimony method generated a phylogenetic tree with no homoplasies, i.
The morphological similarities found in Cassiope and Harrimanella are thus likely symplesiomorphies or homoplasies and not indicative of recent common ancestry.
These transition homoplasies are widely recognized as phylogenetic "noise" and are routinely eliminated from evolutionary comparisons of divergent ([greater than] 10%) DNA sequences.
This means that synapomorphies, plesiomorphies, autapomorphies, and homoplasies are used.