Hone Heke


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Hone Heke

 

Date of birth unknown; died 1846. One of the chiefs of the Maori tribes in New Zealand.

In 1844 and 1845, Hone Heke fought in the Maori Wars, the armed struggle of the Maori against the British colonizers. On several occasions in Kororareka, he destroyed the flagstaff with the British flag, the symbol of colonial supremacy in New Zealand.

References in periodicals archive ?
The second book is set in the Bay of Islands in 1845, the year that Hone Heke attacked and burned the town of Kororareka (now the modern town of Russell.
As a cornerstone for this project, he mobilises Maning in order to overturn conventional understandings of the outcome of the northern conflict, arguing that the rebel Ngapuhi forces, led by Hone Heke and Te Ruki Kawiti, won the war by defeating Colonel Henry Despard's Imperial troops in battles fought at Puketutu, Ohaeawai and Ruapekapeka.
5) Lindsay Buick, New Zealand's First War, or the Rebellion of Hone Heke (Wellington: W.
Local Maori chief Hone Heke chopped down the flagstaff on four separate occasions, with government soldiers erecting a replacement and adding more guards to the post each time.
The reader, along with Leonard Batts, will never know the true significance of the baffling comics starring Captain Cook and Hone Heke which turn up repeatedly throughout Hicksville.
In the recurring 'Captain Cook' comics, Cook and Hone Heke discuss Heke's observation that the landmass of New Zealand has begun to drift free:
It is significant that the characters in this drama of instability are Captain Cook, Hone Heke and Charles Heaphy, figures deeply embedded in the popular consciousness of New Zealand history.
Hone Heke Pokai, one of the leaders of the rebel Ngapuhi forces who fought against British Imperial troops in the 1845-46 war in Tai Tokerau/Northland, starred as one of the most prominent international figures in Outlawed.
Heated debate took place in Aotearoa New Zealand over his inclusion within the exhibition's interpretative framework, with descendants disputing Auckland Museum's refusal to release artefacts for the exhibition because of reservations held by the institution's taumata-a-iwi about 'the potentially negative association of Hone Heke with villains and rebels'.
The record says that in the Bay of Islands, in the 1840s, the Ngapuhi chief Hone Heke cut down the British flagpole four times in all.