honey locust

(redirected from Honey-locust)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

honey locust,

leguminous deciduous tree (Gleditsia triacanthos) of the family Leguminosae (pulsepulse,
in botany, common name for members of the Fabaceae (Leguminosae), a large plant family, called also the pea, or legume, family. Numbering about 650 genera and 17,000 species, the family is third largest, after the asters and the orchids.
..... Click the link for more information.
 family), native to the eastern half of the United States but planted as a shade tree in many regions of the United States and in other countries, where it is sometimes naturalized. It has heavily fragrant flowers attractive to bees, compound leaves made up of small leaflets, and large branching thorns. The pods, which usually twist with age, are brown, flat, about 12 to 18 in. (30.5–45.7 cm) long, and have a sweet, edible pulp that has been used to make beer. Pulp of Asian species has substituted for soap. Wood of the honey locust is durable and has been used chiefly for fence posts and crossties. A thornless variety is widely planted in the N United States as a street tree. Other trees called locust belong to the same family. The honey locust is classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
..... Click the link for more information.
, class Magnoliopsida, order Rosales, family Leguminosae.
Enlarge picture
honey locust

honey locust

Tree grows up to 80 ft (27m) with thorns, greenish flower clusters, flat twisted fruit pods, which are antiseptic, anti-fungal, antibacterial. Pod tea used for lung, stomach and heart issues. Leaves contain anti-cancer compounds. Anything this powerful could be toxic if taken in high doses. There is a similar tree called the Black Locust (Robinia pseudoacacia) that is toxic and doesn’t have the long branched spines on the trunk, instead having pairs of short thorns at the base of each leaf; the leaflets are also much broader on the toxic version.