Hong Xiu Quan

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Hong Xiu Quan

, Hung Hsiu-Ch'uan
1814--64, Chinese religious leader and revolutionary. Claiming (1851) to be Christ's brother, he led the Taiping rebellion; committed suicide when it was defeated
References in periodicals archive ?
The exam was used until 1850, when one disgruntled test taker, Hong Xiuquan, became so embittered over failing four times that he led the Taiping Rebellion, which lasted 14 years, took 20 million lives, and ultimately led to the end of China's monarchy in 1912.
Thanks to cultural misunderstanding and the negative influence of the Taiping Rebellion led by Hong Xiuquan, who claimed to be the younger brother of Jesus, Christians were either banned or forced to leave China.
Actually, this portion of Lutz's study is perhaps the most insightful and significant of the entire work, as she explores the possible connections between the Christian Union and the devastating Taiping Rebellion led by the Christian-inspired Chinese revolutionary, Hong Xiuquan.
Such was Hong Xiuquan (1814-1864), the selfproclaimed younger brother of Jesus Christ whose Taiping ("Great Peace") forces controlled much of southern China by the 1860s.
Both rebellions were led by charismatic figures: Hong Xiuquan of the Taiping and Ya'qub Beg in Central Asia and both were defeated by armies organized by powerful regional leaders who assumed national prominence as a result: Li Hongchang against the Taiping and Zuo Zongtong in Central Asia.
The original vision of Hong Xiuquan and these shorter, but also more frequent and more concrete mediumistic communications formed the basis for all crucial decisions.
When the Quing government sent forces to quell the efforts of Hong Xiuquan who had declared himself the heavenly King of the Taiping Tiango, they met with defeat.
When it became known, however, that Hong Xiuquan believed that his revelation superseded that of the New Testament, many Westerners turned against the Taiping Christians.
There are many Christian historians who will chafe at the thought of this being a "Christian" rebellion, but in Reilly's defense, he shows that the revolutionary leader, Hong Xiuquan, promoted the Bible as the two books that were "pure and without error" (he did not find out until later that the Old and New Testaments were one book in English).
That dramatic event has been interpreted from many perspectives--a peasant uprising against the landlord class, for instance, or a product of the mental illness of its founder, Hong Xiuquan.
In 1837 Hong Xiuquan (1814-64) read Good Words, identified God as China's authentic ruler described in the pre-Confucian texts, and concluded that he himself was Jesus Christ's younger brother.
His pamphlet Good Words for Exhorting the Age (in Chinese) strongly influenced Hong Xiuquan and the Taiping Rebellion.