Aesculus

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Related to Horsechestnut: horse chestnut tree

Aesculus

[‚es·kyə·ləs]
(botany)
A genus of deciduous trees or shrubs belonging to the order Sapindales. Commonly known as buckeye.

Aesculus

 

a genus of tree and, less frequently, shrub of the family Hippocastanaceae. The leaves, which are opposite and digitately compound, usually have five to nine leaflets. The irregular flowers are gathered in erect paniculate inflorescences. There are approximately 15 species (according to other data, 25), growing in Europe (the Balkan Peninsula), Asia (the Himalayas, China, and Japan), and North America. One of the most common is the horse chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum), often grown in gardens and parks. The tree measures up to 30 m tall; its trunk is up to 2 m in diameter. The crown is broad and full. An extract of the roots is used in medications for hemorrhoids, dilation of the veins, thrombophlebitis, atherosclerosis, and other conditions.

References in periodicals archive ?
Last year the team were called to deal with more than 10 horsechestnut trees in the city, providing hundreds of youngsters with the sought-after seeds.
Family Name (Latin and Common): Hippocastanaceae, the Horsechestnut family
The main healing compound horsechestnut is aescine which is very effective in strengthening vein walls and very significant in promoting vein integrity.
Impressive: McInerney's Horsechestnut four-bedroom detached home at Stanley.
Scatterhoarding of horsechestnuts by eastern gray squirrels.
Horsechestnut seed extract (HCSE) has reported venotonic, vascular protective, anti-inflammatory and free radical scavenging properties (Guillaume 1994).
The Rowan showhouse is a threebedroom property with integral garage which starts from pounds 190,000 and the Horsechestnut is a fourbedroom, two-and-a-half-storey family house with integral garage from pounds 250,000.
Deceptively light gel packed with mulberry leaf, soya and avocado to smooth fine lines and horsechestnut to reduce puffiness.
Nor is it surprising that I remember with fondness the horsechestnut in our yard that served as "home-free" in our games of hide-and-go-seek.
Buckeye (Aesculus glabra), or horsechestnut, has long been renowned as a preventive and protective deterrent in faith healing.
If you play conkers then you can recognise when someone is playing with stones rather than horsechestnuts.