horseshoe kidney

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horseshoe kidney

[′hȯr‚shü ‚kid·nē]
(medicine)
Congenital fusion of two kidneys at one pole.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although RIRS is a relatively common treatment method for kidney stones recently, there are not many publications about RIRS in horseshoe kidneys.
The pelvic location is the most common, but horseshoe kidneys, crossed (fused) ectopia and even intrathoracic kidneys have been described.
Horseshoe kidneys have anomalies related to position, orientation of the collecting system, and anomalies of the renal pelvis and ureteropelvic junction, which alters the surgical approach of urolithiasis.
Among these patients, 74% had either unilateral renal agenesis or ectopia of one or both kidneys, 5% had horseshoe kidneys, 13% had abnormalities of the collecting system, 5% had malfunctioning kidneys of uncertain cause, and renal malrotation.
Horseshoe kidneys are frequently complicated by obstruction, infection and calculus formation, and have an increased risk of renal malignancy development, especially Wilms' tumour.
Carcinoid appear over-represented in horseshoe kidneys compared with normal renal anatomy [3,4].
The posterior/anterior shockwave transmission allows the focal zone to penetrate deeper into the body, as is required when treating obese patients or horseshoe kidneys.
Anomalous inferior vena cava associated with horseshoe kidneys.
Sixteen years of experience with stone management in horseshoe kidneys.
A horseshoe kidney is considered a major contraindication owing to the anomalous and unpredictable location of internal renal structures and because horseshoe kidneys often straddle the aorta.