Horthy


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Horthy

Miklós , full name Horthy de Nagybánya. 1868--1957, Hungarian admiral: suppressed Kun's Communist republic (1919); regent of Hungary (1920--44)
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On the walls of the room are maps showing Hungary before it lost its territory in 1920, photographs of Admiral Miklos Horthy, who led Hungary from 1920 to 1944 and orchestrated the country's World War II alliance with Nazi Germany, and a poster saying, "Radical Change.
Hungaryas far-right Jobbik, the third-biggest party in Parliament, stirred outrage in early November when it unveiled a statue in Budapest of a Nazi collaborator, Miklos Horthy, the countryas fascist leader during World War II.
The first is devoted to a listing of prominent naval officers in the twentieth century who opposed Freemasonry, such as French admirals Darlan and Platon, the Austrian Horthy, and the German admiral von Rosenberg.
In 1938, Horthy passed a series of laws restricting the numbers of Jews companies and institutions could employ.
The period's cultural life is described as an era of liberal freedom of expression, against ample evidence to the contrary; the so-called Jewish laws, severely limiting the political and economic rights of Jews, introduced between 1938 and 1941, are attributed to German pressure, contrary to documented evidence; and Horthy and his government's complicity in the Holocaust is minimized and explained as inevitable at every step.
Among the missing elements are the Horthy era in Hungary (19201944), the country's entry into World War II in December 1941 and its involvement in the Holocaust--as for example in some of the pieces that make up the series Private Hungary, such as the films Free Fall, Free Fall Oratorio, The Maelstrom and Dunai exodus, as well as certain parts of the Peto family saga--the representation of the body (see, for instance, Forgacs's first fiction film based on Nadas's work Own Death, a microscopically detailed, cathartic description of a near-death experience caused by a heart attack), the legacy of the Hungarian revolution of 1956, life under the Kadar regime (e.
Both the interwar Horthy era and the thirty-three-year-long communist Kadar regime had its prominent social and political poet-rebels: Attila Jozsef and Gyorgy Petri.
The interwar period is seen as a time of great trials and tribulations, on the one hand; on the other hand, however, the Horthy era is seen as a moral highpoint, an ordered period, and a time when the interests of the community perfectly coincided with those of the leading elites.
It experienced a brief but bloody communist dictatorship and counterrevolution in 1919, followed by a 25-year regency under Admiral Miklos Horthy.
Monarchists had hoped that he might be restored to the vacant Hungarian throne before World War Two but the machinations of the Regent, Admiral Horthy, prevented that.
Counterrevolutionary forces under Admiral Miklos Horthy, formerly of the Austro-Hungarian navy, defeated the communists and restored order.
The Horthy regime, via a chain of reactionary decisions, passed laws against its Jewish citizens, encouraging the anti-Semitic movements of the 1930s and 40s, paving the way for the coming tragedy.