Houdry process

Houdry process

[′hü·drē ‚prä·səs]
(chemical engineering)
References in periodicals archive ?
Only two years after this advertisement appeared in the 1960 edition of Chemistry in Canada, the company was bought by Air Products, which had purchased the Houdry Process Company and its subsidiary Catalytic Construction Company, owner of Catalytic Construction of Canada.
The Houdry process, invented in the 1930s by French-born Eugene Jules Houdry of Pennsylvania, involved using fluid catalytic cracking for the selective conversion of crude petroleum to valuable gasoline.
Turbo-compressors were the early forerunners of several applications, specifically the Houdry process in refineries.
As for Standard Oil, it may have been having supply problems with benzene extracted from coal, and it was certainly having problems with patent lawsuits over the Houdry process for making higher octane gasoline.
After the Second World War Sun moved to license the Houdry process in Europe and the Soviet Union.
High-octane fuel produced by the Houdry process played an important role in the Allied victory in World War II.