Master of the Housebook

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Master of the Housebook

(Meister des Hausbuchs), fl. 1475–1500, German graphic artist. The master is named for a series of vigorous and sophisticated drawings of everyday life found in the Hausbuch at Castle Wolfegg. Many of his engravings are in the Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam. His work is thought to have influenced Bosch, Bruegel, and Dürer.
References in periodicals archive ?
The rich interchange among certain French manuscript painters of the mid- to late fifteenth century, chiefly the eminent Valois court artist Robinet Testard, and Continental engravers like the Housebook Master, as well as various playing card makers, woodcut artists, and printmakers, is well known.
In his late-fifteenth-century dry point, Holy Family by the Rosebush, the Housebook Master goes so far as to show Joseph crawling on the ground and playfully rolling an apple, symbol of the Fall of Adam and Eve, toward the Christ Child (Figure 3).
Based around The Housebook, a fifteenth-century German manuscript that depicts diverse aspects of secular medieval life, this collection of works includes prints, drawings, books and artefacts relating to chivalry, war and domestic arts and pursuits in the period.
In classical times Mercury was thought of as an unageing youth and, indeed, the stepson of Juno, one of the competing goddesses, but the astrologers of the Middle Ages saw him as an elderly sage who, in his planetary guise, presided over artists and scholars; which is how Cranach's contemporary, the Master of the Housebook, depicted him.
Such scenes involving sexual temptation with resultant wasted labor occur, for example in the work of the Housebook Master, around 1490, in the well-known "hunt" sequence "In Pursuit of Lesser Game," where people are distracted from their proper tasks in a variety of ways.
Here, very like the scene by the Housebook Master in which a woman in a well tempts a man feeding domestic fowl, a butter maid is distracted by a man who fondles her through a window; overcome by the sin of lust, she ignores the cat that happily licks her cream from the pot.
Venus and Mars: The World of the Medieval Housebook, Munich and New York: Prestel, 1998.
HARALD TERSCH analyses housebooks and family registers, which always stood in the shadow of the mass source "testaments.