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[′hō·mē·ə‚bäks]
(cell and molecular biology)
A highly conserved sequence of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) that occurs in the coding region of development-controlling regulatory genes and codes for a protein domain that is similar in structure to certain DNA-binding proteins and is thought to be involved in the control of gene expression during morphogenesis and development.
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References in periodicals archive ?
By altering the folding pattern of the Hox cluster, we altered the motor neurons' understanding of their anatomical position," says Esteban Mazzoni, PhD, a study co-investigator and assistant professor of biology and New York University.
Our patient's strong family history is suggestive of a genetic abnormality, possibly the result of an aberration in the combinatorial expression pattern of the Hox genes.
In particular, people with schizophrenia spectrum disorders suffer from deficits in a variety of ToM tasks such as those presented in the previous section (see Brune, 2005a, for a review and Sprong, Schothorst, Vos, Hox, & Van Engeland, 2007, for a meta-analysis).
Hox and Bechger (1998) explain that "perfect fit may be too much to ask for, instead, the problem is to assess how well a given model approximates the true model" (p.
Named Hox, after Harkirn's nickname, the store in Corporation Street is a dream come true for the Hall Green stylist who gave up a career with the BBC to set up in business.
Effects of the antirheumatic remedy hox alpha--a new stinging nettle leaf extract--on matrix metalloproteinases in human chondrocytes in vitro.
Examining seminal and current experiments in such fields as comparative embryology (repurposing of conserved primitive structures) and developmental genetics (function, conservation, and evolution of the Hox genes), Shubin leads the reader to understand that the evolution of man is supported by a cacophony of different scientific voices.
Hox gene duplication and deployment in the annelid leech Helobdella.
This is in stark contrast to the range of reports on the influence of age (see NCES, 2000; O'Leary, 2000), gender, socio-economic status, culture (see Bechger, van Schooten, de Glopper, & Hox, 1998; OECD, 2002) or geographical location (see Webster & Fisher, 2000), may have on educational test performance.
Multilevel analysis with under 10 groups is not recommended as the model parameters tend not to be reliable both in theory (Snijders, & Bosker, 1999) and in simulation studies (Maas, & Hox, 2002).
Hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) techniques have had significant impact on the evaluation of multilevel theoretical models in a variety of disciplines (that is, educational research, criminology, organizational psychology, economics, and family therapy; see Bryk & Raudenbush, 1987,1992; Draper, 1995; Hoeksma & Koomen, 1992; Hox & Kreft, 1994; Kreft & Leeuw, 1998; Moritz & Watson, 1998; Raudenbush, Brennan, & Barnett, 1995; Rogosa & Saner, 1995a, 1995b; Sampson, Raudenbush, & Earls, 1997; Thum, 1997; Vancouver, 1997).