Huckleberry Finn

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Finn, Huckleberry

19th-century picaresque teenager travels down the Mississippi on a raft. [Am. Lit.: Huckleberry Finn]

Finn, Huckleberry

after his supposed death, he dons a girl’s dress and goes into town to gain information. [Am. Lit.: Mark Twain Huckleberry Finn]

Finn, Huckleberry

refuses to turn in Jim, the fugitive slave. [Am. Lit.: Huckleberry Finn]

Finn, Huckleberry

mischievous, sharp-witted boy has many adventures. [Am. Lit.: Huckleberry Finn]

Finn, Huckleberry

his mother dead; his father dies toward end of novel. [Am. Lit.: Huckleberry Finn]
See: Orphan

Finn, Huckleberry

unconventional and resourceful runaway boy. [Am. Lit.: Huckleberry Finn]
References in periodicals archive ?
There have been more than 800 people at past Huck Finn Derbys, which are sponsored by the Rancho Simi Recreation and Park District.
66) His personal manner might be perceived as uncouth, crass, and generally awkward, nevertheless we are invited now to picture Huck Finn, the Penman, scrupulously and reservedly as well as respectfully and complimentarily composing an extended epistolary address (illustrated in the first American edition with a selvage image of the protagonist bowing exceedingly decorously to the audience).
Unfortunately, all of this brings me no closer to the answer regarding Huck Finn.
It was the notion of her own eight-year-old daughter eventually encountering Huck Finn that lent fuel to the writing of My Jim.
Even though Huck Finn follows his heart and not the "deformed conscience" society has bestowed upon him, many readers of all ages continue to marvel at Huck's honest compassion and respect for the good within the other characters from whom he still feels compelled to flee even by the novel's end.
Instead, we prefer to start with literature in which 'otherness' is in evidence, such as Huck Finn.
He contends that Huck Finn seems so central to American literature because it demonstrates the moral confusion about race that is typical of the south and of the nation that often seems like the south writ large.
Today, Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn would have been diagnosed with attention-deficit disorder and medicated.
When I think of Bas Jan Ader, I think of the boy who fell over Niagara Falls, and when I think of the boy who fell over Niagara Falls, I think of another boy who took a journey down a river: Huck Finn.
Dad trusted that we would enter the worlds of Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn, of Ali Baba and the 40 Thieves, and appreciate what we found there.
The literary model Hobson prizes above all others for his analysis is Mark Twain's Huck Finn--that is, the Huck Finn of "deformed conscience and sound heart" (in Henry Nash Smith's phrase, repeated and endorsed by Hobson).