Huckleberry Finn


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

Finn, Huckleberry

19th-century picaresque teenager travels down the Mississippi on a raft. [Am. Lit.: Huckleberry Finn]

Finn, Huckleberry

after his supposed death, he dons a girl’s dress and goes into town to gain information. [Am. Lit.: Mark Twain Huckleberry Finn]

Finn, Huckleberry

refuses to turn in Jim, the fugitive slave. [Am. Lit.: Huckleberry Finn]

Finn, Huckleberry

mischievous, sharp-witted boy has many adventures. [Am. Lit.: Huckleberry Finn]

Finn, Huckleberry

his mother dead; his father dies toward end of novel. [Am. Lit.: Huckleberry Finn]
See: Orphan

Finn, Huckleberry

unconventional and resourceful runaway boy. [Am. Lit.: Huckleberry Finn]
References in periodicals archive ?
In Huckleberry Finn, Twain used the evolution of Huck's character and his relationship with the escaped slave, Jim, to shed light on common prejudices against African-Americans.
On the basis of an exchange between Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn, Berrong concludes that Jim is "considerably older than his early twenties," which is how old I imagined him to be.
Most critics feel that once Tom Sawyer shows up, Huckleberry Finn devolves into little more than minstrel-show satire and broad comedy that cheapens the deep, transgressive bond that has evolved between Huck and Jim.
By common agreement, Huckleberry Finn is not only the most American boy in literature, but is also the character with whom American readers of all ages tend to identify most readily and most intimately.
My Jim (Crown Publishers, January 2005) by Seattle--based writer Nancy Rawles reimagines a riffler life for the runaway slave Jim from The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.
A new range of Huckleberry Finn smoothies has been introduced by The Waterfront Corporation, offering consumers 100% fruit pure juice.
Lovers of American literature will find much food for thought in this highly distinguished critic's reading of the five selected classics: Melville's Moby-Dick, Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter, Thoreau's Walden, Whitman's Leaves of Grass, and Twain's Huckleberry Finn.
However, the introduction also makes a more focused claim for the centrality of Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn to southern novels' subsequent portrayals of race.
is billed as a high-energy musical set in Mississippi that follows the trials and tribulations of Huckleberry Finn and his friend Jim, a runaway slave.
Essayists look at games, pets, adolescent sexuality, death, family relations, and key texts such as The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and the movie Pocahontas; they reveal the ways in which the figure of the child operates as a rich vehicle for writers to consider evolving ideas of nation and the diverse role of citizens within it.
Thomas Quirk--whom Louis Budd says, "speaks more wisely about Huckleberry Finn than any other person around"--has examined these striking critical omissions.
Golden also writes that she disliked the exhibition because it reminded her of her days as a black girl in an all-white private school, where she was made to feel uncomfortable by the way her class discussed the black characters in Huckleberry Finn.