Huguenot


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Huguenot

1. a French Calvinist, esp of the 16th or 17th centuries
2. designating the French Protestant Church
References in periodicals archive ?
Revising his doctoral dissertation for McMaster University, Must demonstrates the key elements of a hybrid Huguenot identity as they were expressed in sermons, and the political strategies that were a product of seeking a particular place for Huguenots in France during the 17th century.
The Houlihans are keeping it in the family, arranging a $21 million mortgage for 145 Huguenot Street in New Rochelle.
HFF marketed the property exclusively on behalf of the seller, 255 Huguenot Street, Corp.
This decimated the Huguenot presence in France; Jacoby argues that the phenomenon's impact is comparable to Spain's expulsion of Muslims and conversos.
This book is an excellent introduction for those coming to Huguenot history for the first time as well as a detailed and coherent overview for those already familiar with the era.
The name Cameron comes from Cambernon in Normandy, Corbyn from Corbon in Calvados and Farage is a French Huguenot name.
OXFORD -- The annual town picnic and concert at the fort will be held at the Huguenot Fort site on Fort Hill Road from noon to 4 p.
Sharon Chapman on Bedworth's regalia manufacturers appearing on TV I was aware of the Toye Huguenot background and think it is well worth mentioning that it is widely believed that the Huguenots also played a major part in the establishment of watchmaking in Coventry.
He was born in 1688, the son of a Huguenot forced to flee his French home in 1685 as a victim of the so-called Revocation of the Edict of Nantes.
Editors McKee and Vigne are affiliated with the Irish Section of the Huguenot Society of Great Britain.
The pot has a history which celebrates the rise of coffee's popularity in England and the Protestant Huguenot exile community who fled to Britain from persecution in France.
It was founded in 1693 by a Huguenot family headed by Hollander Gerrit Janz van Vuuren and his French Huguenot wife who toiled the virgin soil and planted the first 1,000 vines.