emancipation

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emancipation

the collective freeing of a slave population in specific countries or colonial territories. The word is of Latin origin, meaning ‘to transfer ownership’. The freeing of slave populations in the Western hemisphere has usually been by issue of a legal decree, i.e. an ‘emancipation proclamation’. Britain abolished slavery in its empire in 1833, while in the US an emancipation proclamation was issued in 1862, but did not take effect until 1865, at the end of the Civil War.
References in periodicals archive ?
But we must also point to real, feasible, and achievable Utopias by exploring alternative visions of society that are more amenable to pursuing human emancipation (Otero and Preibisch 2015).
For this purpose Lessing contests the speculative-cum-emancipatory metanarratives in the form of Psychoanalysis and Marxist Communism for their overarching claims of human emancipation.
Oliga's (1991) focus on "empowerment and transformation" of social systems, as well as Ulrich's (1987; 2003) critical systems discourse, mirror CST's commitment to working towards human emancipation and facilitating the development of full human potential through equal participation in systems.
Kissack insists at several points in his analysis that the anarchist sex radicals were not necessarily gay but rather, by applying the fundamental tenets of anarchy to the sexual question, they fought on the side of any oppressed group: "Anarchism was the only political movement of the time to treat issues of sexual liberation as fundamental to the project of human emancipation.
Goodhart's work seeks to find new ways for preserving and furthering human emancipation and empowerment.
Political Change and Human Emancipation in the Works of Heinrich von Kleist.
of Plymouth, UK) suggests that his field is fundamentally concerned with the questions of whether scientific knowledge can claim to be universal knowledge and whether science facilitates human emancipation.
In an historical sequence, the main themes of the critique of politics are: (1) the idea that political emancipation is not complete human emancipation, (2) the proposal of the proletariat as the universal class capable of overcoming alienation and (3) the proposal of the communist society.
Seymour Drescher stands as one of the academy's foremost interpreters of the history of slavery and abolition, and his Mighty Experiment can be seen as the culmination of decades of painstaking research and mature reflection on the complicated process that in the British empire forwarded the global project of human emancipation.
As such it needs to be viewed in terms of its relationship to the culture from a critical perspective for the purpose of human emancipation.
placed homosexuality within a broad context of human emancipation, embracing feminism and workers' rights.