One Hundred Years of Solitude

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One Hundred Years of Solitude

encompasses the sweep of Latin American history. [Lat. Am. Lit.: Gabriel Garcia Marquez One Hundred Years of Solitude in Weiss, 336]
See: Epic
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14 Colombia's most famous writer Gabriel Garcia Marquez (1925- ), author of the worldwide best seller One Hundred Years of Solitude, won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1982 and is exiled in Mexico because of the violence in his home country.
Father Vsevolod Chaplin, head of public relations for the Russian Orthodox Church in Moscow, wants Russian schools to ban a few modern novels, including Vladimir Nabokov's "Lolita" and Gabriel Garcia Marquez's "One Hundred Years of Solitude.
One October in Paraty, as it rained twenty-three days out of thirty-one, I sat and read One Hundred Years of Solitude, never for a moment doubting the truth of Garcia Marquez's wonderful story.
Numerous stylistic echoes of One Hundred Years of Solitude suggest Mastretta's admiration for the Colombian master: "She discovered her true worth, leapt several times across the chasm of her fears, and learned that affection is never spent even though it is fully given.
I also teach the first chapter of One Hundred Years of Solitude to my Hispanic students as an introduction to magic realism.
The epic 1967 novel "One Hundred Years of Solitude sold more than 50 million copies in more than 25 languages.
For example, when the reader comes across the character La China Hereje's ruminations about her lover El Viejo, the editor duly notes the reference to the first sentence of Gabriel Garcia Marquez's One Hundred Years of Solitude.
Her narrative suffers from what I shall call "the Macondo syndrome," an endemic sickness through which writers worldwide, by a stroke of lightning, duplicate One Hundred Years of Solitude.
I shared with him color snapshots of a twenty-foot long mural based on One Hundred Years of Solitude I had done many years earlier.
The book functions as a kind of guide to works such as One Hundred Years of Solitude, Chronicle of a Death Foretold, and Love in the Time of Cholera, illuminating material familiar to readers and placing it in its real-life context.
With this novel, the author puts to rest the cycle of Bearn, much as Garcia Marquez moved out of Macondo after One Hundred Years of Solitude.
A master of the understatement, he recounts the most extraordinary incidents as though they were perfectly commonplace and, as in his masterpiece, One Hundred Years of Solitude, he imbues the everyday or the verifiably historical with an aura of fantasy.