Hydaspes

Hydaspes

 

the ancient Greek name for the Jhelum River (also known as Vitatsa or Bihat) in India, a left tributary of the Indus River.

In 326 B.C. a battle took place on the left bank of the Hydaspes between the troops of Alexander the Great (30,000 men, including 5,000 cavalry) and those of the Indian ruler Poros (up to 34,000 men, including 3,000-4,000 cavalry, 300 battle chariots, 200 battle elephants). Leaving part of his forces on the right bank opposite Poros’ camp, Alexander, with the main part of his troops, forced the Hydaspes upstream, defeated a 2,000-man detachment sent against him, and forced Poros to flee his camp. In the unfolding battle, Alexander inflicted a blow with his cavalry on his opponent’s flanks and routed Poros’ troops, who suffered 23,000 killed.

References in periodicals archive ?
Now compare this with what happened at the Battle of Hydaspes (the river Vitasta/Vehat / Jhelum) in 326BC near present-day Bhera in Punjab.
Towards the end of the tenth and last book of Heliodorus' Aethiopica, a character who was left behind by the protagonists in Delphi in Book Four makes a surprising reappearance in Ethiopia: Charicles, the Greek foster-father of the heroine Charicleia, arrives in Meroe, where the royal couple reside, and demands his daughter back from king Hydaspes, who is her biological father.
The pantarb jewel later plays an important part in the recognition of Chariclea as the daughter of Hydaspes since the king recognises it as one he had given Persinna during their courtship (4.
Regarding Taxila the classical writers unanimously hold this opinion that it was the largest city located between Indus and Hydaspes (Jhelum)29.
The Indian warlord Pururava learned this quite directly at the hands of Alexander at the Hydaspes.
Young provides comprehensive descriptions of several key battles, including the Battle of Issus, which marked the first significant defeat of Persia; the Siege of Tyre, which lasted seven gruesome months; and the Battle of the Hydaspes River, which provided the West with access to India.
According to the diary, Alexander of Macedonia termed Taxila as a city 'most considerable between the Indus and the Hydaspes (Jhelum)".
The Battle of the Hydaspes River was fought by Alexander the Great in 326 BC against King Porus of the Hindu Paurava kingdom on the banks of the Jhelum River in Punjab, now Pakistan.
However, not until various proofs and testimonials are presented from different parties is Hydaspes convinced of her lineage.
The battle of the Hydaspes River was fought by Alexander the Great in 326 BC against King Porus of the Hindu Paurava Kingdom on the banks of the Hydaspes River (Jhelum River) in the Punjab near Bhera (Pind Dadan Khan) in modern-day Pakistan.
In 2003 we noted the variability of Hydaspes in response to Chryse dust activity, and it also looked somewhat variable in 2005 (see under 'dust storms').
A year later, after a costly victory at Hydaspes (hye-DAS-peez), his soldiers refused to go any farther.