Hydrophytes


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Hydrophytes

 

water plants that are fixed in the soil, with only their lower parts submerged. Hydrophytes grow along the shores of rivers, lakes, ponds, and seas, as well as in swamps and swampy meadows (so-called helophytes). Some hydrophytes grow in wet fields as weeds (for example, water plantains and reeds). The hydrophyte root system is well developed. It conducts water and the nutrients dissolved in it and gives the plant support in the soil. Unlike hydatophytes, hydrophytes have well-developed mechanical tissues and vessels to conduct water. They have many intercellular spaces and air cavities, which supply air to the lower parts of the plant, since there is less oxygen in the water than in the air. Rice is a cultivated hydrophyte. Many of the hydrophytes that overgrow swampy areas often form peat. Some hydrophytes—especially the monocotyledons—are used as cattle fodder.

References in periodicals archive ?
Conversely, eddies and low-velocity runs have accumulated fine sediments because they are no longer flushed by high flows (Grams and Schmidt, 2002) and have been colonized by five of the six hydrophytes (E.
Discerning the differences between the boundaries of the territories covered with hydrophytes and helophytes was the most difficult problem.
In the Fall of 2001, the percentage of herbaceous plant species sampled in the reference wetland that were classified as hydrophytes was 70%, whereas 56% of the plant species sampled in the constructed wetland were classified as hydrophytes (Tables 1 and 5).
We delineated wetland boundaries by including all areas that appeared permanently or seasonally flooded with shallow water depths where hydrophytes composed more than 50% of the vegetation.
Colonization by hydrophytes is dependent not only on germination of the dormant seed bank but also on wind, water, and animal-borne seed dispersal (Galatowitsch and van der Valk 1993).
The two Marsilea species existed in marshy habitat, and Azolla pinnata (Azollaceae) occurred as a free floating hydrophyte.
The first stage in the distribution of radionuclides in fresh water ecosystem is quick and intense processes of accumulation of radionuclides in the bottom sediments and hydrophytes.
Because this ditch remained wet the entire growing season and because the ditch was bordered on its south side by an undisturbed, privately-owned fen/sedge meadow, this habitat boasted a very rich biodiversity of hydrophytes.
The vegetation patterns are dominated by Typha dominguensis (tule); in addition to eight subdominant hydrophytes, a total of 24 species was documented.
Initially, all had some water in a basin with identifiable hydrophytes.
The soil is saturated long enough during the growing season to develop anaerobic (without oxygen) conditions that favor the growth of hydrophytes.
This study concentrated on the first parameter used to define wetlands, namely the presence of hydrophytes.