hyperreality

(redirected from Hyper-realism)
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hyperreality

‘the world of self-referential signs’ – ‘the new linguistic condition of society’, according to BAUDRILLARD, in which the alleged ‘real’ is no more real than the thing which feigns it.
References in periodicals archive ?
In a secularised society unaccustomed to the visceral excesses of Counter-Reformation Spanish Catholicism, there was clearly much consternation and even some embarrassment as to how one should react to such visual hyper-realism.
features a show entitled "Manic and Hyper-Realism," including paintings by Shawn Mediaclast and Jeremy Covert.
As pure spectacle, pic is superb throughout--all sharp-edged, vivid tones, richly illuminated to the point of hyper-realism, whether framing in close-up Jin's craftsmanship or simply taking in claustrophobic domestic spaces that seem to have been lifted directly from interior-design catalogs.
Imagina 2009 will then propose more emphasis on 3D contribution into Automobile design and production cycles highlighted by conferences on Digital mock-up, extended scope, Simulation, Hyper-realism and Real Time, animated by experts, professional, witnessing through cases and evidences.
David Fincher's trashcan tour of branded consumption and disposal in Fight Club (1999) seems like a novelty digital effect shot now, but when I first saw it, I was disturbed and intrigued by a cinematic language that could blend a terrain flyover with the hyper-realism of Fantastic Voyage (1966).
It is a hyper-sensory description akin to hyper-realism in painting, where artists sometimes render details that would be beyond human seeing.
Richard Maxwell, renowned for his flat and minimalist productions of contemporary plays in New York, brought his distinctive brand of hyper-realism to Shakespeare for the first time in this production.
All these scenes are studies in hyper-realism compared with Andie telling Hugh about all the notches on her bedpost, and Hugh doesn't even call her a whore.
He took the words "simulation" and "simulacrum" to describe the "Beaubourg effect"--no longer able to distinguish model from copy, we had lost any sense of reality, leaving us only with "irony," hyper-realism, kitsch, quotation, appropriation.
Images might be filled with swirling lines that depict both visible and unseen movement, as though the artists experienced the world from a state of hyper-realism on some molecular level.
At first, hyper-realism may seem to be a radical proposal, similar to what Marcuse had in mind when he declared that art is autonomous and can challenge the social and political status quo.