Hypotonic Solutions

Hypotonic Solutions

 

in biology, various solutions that have an osmotic pressure lower than that of the cells of plant and animal tissues. In hypotonic solutions, cells absorb the fluid, expand, and lose part of their osmotic agents (organic and mineral substances). When placed in hypotonic solutions, erythrocytes in human and animal blood become distended to such a degree that their membranes burst, and they are destroyed. This phenomenon is called hemolysis.

References in periodicals archive ?
However, recent studies have demonstrated that the tonicity of the enteral rehydration solution affects the level of water and electrolyte absorption, with hypotonic solutions resulting in better water absorption than isotonic solutions in children (RAUTANEN et al.
9% NS, LR or hypotonic solutions, replacing electrolytes, restricting sodium in cases of hypernatremia, and offering oral free water (Daniels, 2010; Daniels & Nicoll, 2012).
The AAGL's Practice Guidelines for the Management of Hysteroscopic Distending Media lists an intravasation safety limit of 2,500 cc for isotonic solution, compared with a maximum limit of 1,000 cc when using hypotonic solutions (J.
Product manager, Melanie Tymm, told OT: "Research has shown that hypotonic solutions provide measurably greater improvements in the symptoms of dry eye syndrome than isotonic solutions so changing Hyabak to a hypotonic solution was a natural progression for the company.
Fluids that should not be used in septic shock are 5% dextrose or hypotonic solutions, e.
We have found that hypotonic solutions (low in salt) strongly activate inflammation at molecular level.
Hypotonic solutions contain only minimal solute concentrations and greater concentrations of water.
Significant differences were found for carnitine and acylcarnitine levels in blood washed with an isotonic solution compared to its levels using several hypotonic solutions (p<0.
The degrees of swelling and osmotic resistance in hypotonic solutions of erythrocyte from various domestic animals.
Four pediatric deaths due to acute hyponatremia associated with intravenous (IV) administration of hypotonic solutions, three in a postsurgical setting and the other in a medical setting were voluntarily reported (two to the Institute for Safe Medication Practices Canada [ISMP Canada] and two to the Institute for Safe Medication Practices [ISMP] in the United States).
Findings from a meta-analysis that included 6 randomized controlled trials indicated that hypotonic solutions (less than 0.
Because rapid fluid replacement with hypotonic solutions carries an increased risk of cerebral edema, the consensus statement urged slower fluid-deficit correction with isotonic or near-isotonic solutions, which achieve earlier reversal of acidosis.