three

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three

1. the cardinal number that is the sum of two and one and is a prime number
2. a numeral, 3, III, (iii), representing this number
3. the amount or quantity that is one greater than two
4. something representing, represented by, or consisting of three units such as a playing card with three symbols on it

three

symbolizes good luck; most holy of all numbers. [World Culture: Jobes, 1563–1566]
References in classic literature ?
He got out two or three curtain-calico suits, which he said was meedyevil armor for Richard III.
The republican missionaries of Oahu cause to be gazetted in the Court Journal, published at Honolulu, the most trivial movement of 'his gracious majesty' King Kammehammaha III, and 'their highnesses the princes of the blood royal'.
I really believe," said he, "I could be fool enough at this moment to undertake any character that ever was written, from Shylock or Richard III down to the singing hero of a farce in his scarlet coat and cocked hat.
Tradition said that this house with the pointed gables was inhabited, in the time of Henry III.
After them came a long line of artillery; then more cavalry, in splendid uniforms; and then their imperial majesties Napoleon III and Abdul Aziz.
Napoleon III, the representative of the highest modern civilization, progress, and refinement; Abdul-Aziz, the representative of a people by nature and training filthy, brutish, ignorant, unprogressive, superstitious--and a government whose Three Graces are Tyranny, Rapacity, Blood.
Why was Napoleon III a criminal when he was taken prisoner at Boulogne, and why, later on, were those criminals whom he arrested?
Equally little does this view explain why for several centuries the collective will is not withdrawn from certain rulers and their heirs, and then suddenly during a period of fifty years is transferred to the Convention, to the Directory, to Napoleon, to Alexander, to Louis XVIII, to Napoleon again, to Charles X, to Louis Philippe, to a Republican government, and to Napoleon III.
In this way I became familiar with Shakespeare before I read him, or at least such plays of his as were most given in those days, and I saw "Macbeth" and "Hamlet," and above all "Richard III.
It started, directly, in the London palace of Henry III, and was the result of a quarrel between the King and his powerful brother-in-law, Simon de Montfort, Earl of Leicester.
In the time of Edward III England was England again, and the rulers were English both in heart and in name.
The middle of the fourteenth century was also the middle of the externally brilliant fifty years' reign of Edward III.