Network Address Translation

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Network Address Translation

(networking)
(NAT, or Network Address Translator, Virtual LAN) A technique in which a router or firewall rewrites the source and/or destination Internet addresses in a packet as it passes through, typically to allow multiple hosts to connect to the Internet via a single external IP address. NAT keeps track of outbound connections and distributes incoming packets to the correct machine.

NAT is an alternative to adopting IPv6 (IPng). It allows the same IP addresses (10.x.x.x is the conventional range) to be used on many private local networks while requiring only one of the increasingly scarce public addresses to be allocated to each private network.

NAT does not however allow an external service to initiate a TCP connection to an internal host, nor does it support stateless protocols based on UDP well unless the router software has extensions to support each specific protocol.
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SIP software and hardware clients (including SIP-compatible VoIP phones) can work behind an IP masquerading firewall or NAT router.
High-Security Firewall With Port Forwarding and IP Masquerading
1 offers support for the newly released Linux NetFilter firewall and for IP masquerading - the Linux equivalent of network address translating.
Meanwhile Tokyo, Japan-based Pacific HiTech announced its own TurboLinux cluster server, boasting load balancing and IP masquerading and priced from $1,995 for two machines.
Net2Printer works with firewalls, proxy servers, and IP masquerading (NAT).
And its firewall, individual port forwarding, and IP masquerading provide high security in Internet use.
New features include support for the newly released Linux NetFilter firewall and support for IP masquerading.
130 is no exception, addressing problems in NFS, IP masquerading and elsewhere.
In addition, users will benefit from IP masquerading, which allows for multiple computers to share a single Internet connection.
Source IP filtering prevents any potential IP masquerading.
It discusses the basics of setting up a network on a single client machine, as well as basic routing, gateways, and IP masquerading.