electromagnetic spectrum

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electromagnetic spectrum

See electromagnetic radiation.

electromagnetic spectrum

[i¦lek·trō·mag′ned·ik ′spek·trəm]
(electromagnetism)
The total range of wavelengths or frequencies of electromagnetic radiation, extending from the longest radio waves to the shortest known cosmic rays.

electromagnetic spectrum

electromagnetic spectrumclick for a larger image
electromagnetic spectrumclick for a larger image
electromagnetic spectrumclick for a larger image
electromagnetic spectrumclick for a larger image
The ordered array of known electromagnetic radiation, extending from the shortest cosmic rays, through gamma rays, X-rays, ultraviolet radiation, visible radiation, and infrared radiation. It includes microwave and all other wavelengths of radio energy. See the illustration for a more detailed view of this spectrum.
References in periodicals archive ?
For [Zn(L)(Ac)(H 2 O) 2 ] IR spectrum (Upsilon, cm - 1 ): 3430-3550 (O-H), 1609 (C=N), 1542 (AcO), 1311 (C-O); 1 H NMR (CD 3 COCD 3 -DMSO-d 6 , Delta, ppm): 8.
1] on PCR models because of its strong intensity in the IR spectrum, it is not obvious in all models but quartz.
Compound (3) was identified as [beta]-sitosterol by co-TLC and complete superimposable IR spectrum with that of an authentic sample.
The IR spectrum (not shown) of the sample corresponding to the [R.
When cool roof coatings were introduced, we had to match their existing colors, but with higher reflectance in the IR spectrum of the sun's energy.
The energy produced by these vibrational modes varies widely over the IR spectrum, and this is reflected in the wide variety of spectrometers that have been developed.
In the case of our hypothetical tablet, the IR spectrum confirms that the oily residue is hydrocarbon oil.
On gold nanoparticles that are 5 nm in diameter, the IR spectrum changes completely, indicating that as much as 78 percent of the peptide takes up a [beta]-sheet structure.
Concentrating on the latest developments for efficiently cooling detectors that operate in the middle- and long-wavelength IR spectrum, practitioner Piotrowski and Rogalski (applied physics, Military U, of Technology, Warsaw) describe innovations in the cooling of many types of IR photodetectors with emphasis on HgCdTe alloy based detectors.
It can monitor blend composition, cure level, layer thickness, tensile strength, and any other property that correlates with a material's IR spectrum.