Ibadites

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Ibadites

 

or Abadites, followers of a moderate movement of the Muslim Khariji sect. The sect was founded in the seventeenth century in Iraq and was named after Abd-allah-ibn-Ibad, who formulated its concepts. Ibadites fought against the caliphate and created their own imamates, among them the one in Taher, North Africa, which lasted from the eighth to the beginning of the tenth century. Ibadites are found today in Oman and in the North African states of Algeria, Tunisia, and Libya.

REFERENCE

Lewicki, T. “Les subdivisions de l’Ibădiyya.” In the collection Studia islamica,[vol.] 9. Paris, 1958.
References in periodicals archive ?
Savage does, however, convincingly describe a mixed and tolerant Ibadi world where Christians circulated and lived, with some of them playing important roles in commerce and even politics.
Horton's argument for early conversion is controversial and his evidence for the possible presence of Ibadi and Shi'i Muslims is very thin.
It seems more likely that siyar here refers to a "doctrinal position" or "stance," a meaning the term acquired in late Umayyad times and which is retained by the Ibadi tradition.
The Ibadi saying, "There dwells an imam in every soul", should indicate that, for Khuri, the cluster of tents presages the formation of the Arab struggle for dominance.
Samad hailed the stand taken by Premier Haidar Ibadi for rejecting such intervention.
That is sharp language, unintentionally offensive to Ibadi Muslims.
Among the notables are an exquisite 19th-century hammam (bath house), a unique Ibadi mosque built in 1855, and Sultan Barghash's ceremonial palace - an unusual combination of Arab and British colonial design.
Ibadi stressed that Iraq does not need foreign ground forces, pointing that no request was given to Iraq by any foreign country to send ground forces here, adding that the Iraqi armed forces were directed not to depend on foreign air strikes, but "should regard them as an auxiliary force".
Here she has used both Sunni and Shii "mainstream" historians and geographers, but also many internal Ibadi accounts.
They presented a list of names, training camps and cells linked to Iran," Haidar Al Ibadi, a member of Iraqi Prime Minister Nuri Al Maliki's Dawa party, said.
There is a small community of Ibadi Muslims in Ghardaia.
Examples of labels include, for example, Arab, Arab Muslim, Arab Shi'ah, Ibadi, Omani, Arab Sunni, Bahraini, Iranian, Wahabi, Saudi, Kuwaiti, Shi'ah, Muslim, Christian, Hindu, male, female, foreign archaeologist and indigenous archaeologist.