Avempace

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Avempace

(ā`vəmpās, ä'vĕmpä`thā), Arabic Ibn Bajja, d. 1138, Spanish-Arab philosopher. Little is known of his life, but he was born in Zaragoza and died in Fès, Morocco. Developing the tradition of Islamic Aristotelian-Neoplatonism begun in the east by al-FarabiFarabi, al-
, d. 950, Islamic philosopher. He studied in Baghdad and later flourished in Aleppo as a sufi mystic (see Sufism). He died in Damascus. Al-Farabi was the author of an encyclopedic work drawn largely from Aristotle; he was one of the earliest Islamic thinkers to
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, Avemplace was the first important Spanish representative of this philosophy. Among his chief opinions was a belief in the possibility in the union of the human soul with the Divine, which later commentators found to be heterodox.
References in periodicals archive ?
A classic polymath-philosopher, physician, astronomer, mathematician, and poet, Abu Bakr Mohammad Ibn Yahyah Ibn Al Sayigh Al Tujibi Ibn Bajjah, better known as Ibn Bajjah -- Avempace in the Latinised version -- was a master of logic.
Ibn Bajjah introduced specific ethical norms in his reflection too, educating the hermit to teach himself, at least as a first step, to be ruled by will and reason, so that his actions may all be human.
When Ibn Bajjah was born in Saragossa around 1085, the city was the capital of the Taifah Kingdom of the Banu Hud, under the rule of Yousuf Al Mu'tamin Ibn Hud (r.
Ibn Bajjah worked in Court as a minister [wazir] and served the sultan's brother-in-law Abu Bakr aACAyAli Ibn Ibrahim Al Sahrawi, better known as Ibn Tifilwit, then the Governor of Saragossa.
When King Alfonso conquered Saragossa from the Almoravids in 1118, Ibn Bajjah hastiley left town and sought refuge at the Court of Abu Ish'aq Ebrahim Ibn Yousuf Ibn Tashufin, in XEatiba, in the Eastern part of al-Andalus.
Important scholars, such as Ibn Tufail, Ibn Bajjah and Ibn Rushd -- the two latter also known in the West as Avempace and Averroes respectively -- introduced and developed physics, political science, philosophy, jurisprudence, medicine, architecture, psychology, music, poetry and literature.
Saeed Bin Suroor, able to boast a 50 per cent strike-rate (five winners from ten runners) with two-year-olds on this course in recent seasons, added to that tally, courtesy of Ibn Bajjah in the 1m maiden.
One wonders, for example, why nothing is said of Ibn Tufayl and his delightful philosophical novel, Hayy ibn Yaqzan (Living the Son of Awakened), or of Ibn Bajjah and his Tadbir al-Mutawahhid (Governance of the Solitary).
Ibn Sina's views were added to those of Ibn al-Haytham, who spoke of momentum, as well as the theories of Ibn Bajjah and others, and they played a critical role in showing the weakness of Aristotelian physics in explaining projectile motion and in preparing the ground for Galileo's rejection of that physics.
Islamic Philosophers in the Western Lands of Islam" covers Ibn Masarrah, Ibn Bajjah, Ibn Tufayl, Ibn Rushd, Ibn Sab in, and Ibn Khaldun.
In his introduction, the author presents useful summaries of views held by major philosophers, ranging from Al Farabi to Ibn Sina, and from Al Gazzali to Ibn Bajjah.
Although duty required that he study the law and serve his masters as a jurist, Ibn Rushd was attracted by the philosophy of Ibn Bajjah, who may have tutored him, and actually enrolled in medical school under Abu Ja'far Ibn Harun in Trujillo, a key Arab fortress southwest of Madrid.