Ibn Tufayl

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Ibn Tufayl

(ĭ`bən to͞ofāl`), d. 1185/86?, 12th-century Spanish-Arab philosopher and physician, b. near Granada. His chief work was a philosophical romance, Hayy ibn Yaqzan, describing the development of a hermit, who, after long seclusion on an island, attains knowledge of the divine. He later comes into contact with a man trained in religion, the point of the work being the conflict between philosophy and religion. The book was translated into several European languages in the 17th cent. and was widely read. Ibn Tufayl, called Abubacer by Europeans, was famous as a physician.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the first paper, "The Rationality of Everyday Life: An Andalusian Tradition," Dominique Urvoy contends that Ibn Tufail confronted two principal questions.
In another sense, however, the papers tend to be disciplinary in that writers pose questions about Ibn Tufail and his treatise, Hayy ibn Yaqzan, that more involve preoccupations of their own disciplines than reflect truly interdisciplinary concerns.
On this basis, he suggests that Ibn Tufail was more involved with Sufism than has hitherto been believed and offers the "tantalizing possibility.
Radtke's discussion is balanced and rational; he concludes that in essence Ibn Tufail was a Neoplatonic "emanationist" who, although he may have adopted some terminology from the Sails, did not adopt their system (p.
Important scholars, such as Ibn Tufail, Ibn Bajjah and Ibn Rushd -- the two latter also known in the West as Avempace and Averroes respectively -- introduced and developed physics, political science, philosophy, jurisprudence, medicine, architecture, psychology, music, poetry and literature.
He has translated into Estonian the works of a number of prominent authors (Omar Khayyam, Rudaki, Saadi, Ibn Tufail and others).