ice cap

(redirected from Ice caps)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.
Related to Ice caps: Polar ice caps

ice cap

[′īs ‚kap]
(hydrology)
A perennial cover of ice and snow in the shape of a dome or plate on the summit area of a mountain through which the mountain peaks emerge.
A perennial cover of ice and snow on a flat land mass such as an Arctic island.
References in periodicals archive ?
The rapid sea level rise that happened between 8,000 and 15,000 years ago was due to melting ice caps, which were originally hundreds to thousands of feet high.
I believe that record accurately reflects drought conditions in Africa and the Middle East and that the dust was carried out across the Atlantic Ocean by the northeast trade winds, across the Amazon Basin, and deposited on the Huascaran ice cap.
One of the most distinctive features of the northern ice cap is Chasma Boreale, a canyon about as long as Earth's Grand Canyon but deeper and wider.
The added gas from the polar ice caps didn't significantly affect that proportion.
Andy Bairstow, communications director for Nexus, said: "We sponsored Brian because of his determination to reach the Pole and bring back a lesson for schools about the impact of our modern lives on the polar ice caps.
That could explain why the ice cap at that pole has been melting recently, scientists say.
Small glaciers and ice caps are the major contributors to rising sea levels in recent years, according to a new University of Colorado at Boulder study.
Science, technology, and society: Scientists are studying how the melting of polar ice caps is affecting Arctic animals.
Kevin, 47, started the trek from Base Camp Barneo, a Russian military base on a frozen ice cap 75 miles from the Geographical North Pole.
As the Ice Age came to an end and the ice cap receded, the people migrated northwards and, eventually, came to Canada.
For example: Contrary to claims that rising global temperatures will melt the ice caps of Greenland and Antarctica, thus elevating sea levels catastrophically, average temperatures over Greenland have been falling since 1987 at a rather steep rate of 2.
Just a small climactic shift could trigger freak weather conditions or increase the pace at which the polar ice caps melt.