Icteridae


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Related to Icteridae: New World blackbird, Dolichonyx, Icterids

Icteridae

[ik′ter·ə‚dē]
(vertebrate zoology)
The troupials, a family of New World perching birds in the suborder Oscines.

Icteridae

 

a family of birds of the order Passeriformes. The body is 16.5– cm long. The bill is conical, slender in some species, and massive and sometimes enlarged at the base in others. The tail is graduate, and the plumage black or brownish, sometimes with red or yellow patches. There are 88 species, distributed throughout North and South America. They inhabit deserts, prairies, swamps, and forests, biologically replacing skylarks, starlings, orioles, and other Old World birds. Many species are polygamous and form colonies. Their nests vary from small open ones on the ground to large (1.8 m long) “purses” in trees. The number of eggs in a clutch varies from two or three (in the tropics) to five or six; only the female sits on them. Some species are parasites, depositing their eggs in the nests of other birds. They feed on insects, seeds, nectar, and the juice of fruits, and certain species, for example, Icterus galbula, injure fruit trees.

References in periodicals archive ?
The family Estrildidae is a relatively homogenous group on osteologic characters, contrasting with Emberizinae (Webster & Webster 1999) and Icteridae (Webster 2003) in this respect.
Disjunct nocturnal roosting by Nearctic-Neotropical migrant passerines during migration has been reported in Icteridae (Watts 1997) and Hirundinidae (Winkler 2006), but we are not aware of published observations of this behavior in arboreal passerines at stopover sites.
melanocephalus (Swainson), I R black-headed grosbeak Spiza americana (Gmelin), I O dickcissel Family Icteridae (icterines) Agelaius phoeniceus (Linnaeus), I A red-winged blackbird Dolichonyx oryzivorus (Linnaeus), I O bobolink Euphagus carolinus (Muller), rusty I R blackbird E.
There are reports of nest material kleptoparasitism in North America in Vireonidae, Polioptilidae, Parulidae, and Icteridae (Jones et al.
This behavior has been reported in Icteridae for no fewer than 14 species (Fraga 2008), including 13 members of the South American quiscaline clade (i.