Idiolect


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Idiolect

 

(also called individual language), the linguistic habits of a given individual in a particular time period. Such linguistic phenomena as the various speech communities— professional, social, and territorial dialects and jargons—are formed on the basis of the aggregate of idiolects unified by a relationship of mutual comprehension. The idiolect is a conventional concept, since the same person, as a rule, uses different linguistic means in different situations of communication. Researchers in logopedics are investigating the individual idiolects of aphasiacs.

References in periodicals archive ?
Vowel loss in respective positions is thus cognitively complete in her idiolect.
Although it is clear from later letters that Margaret's idiolect changed through the course of her teenage years (evidence for this is discussed in the following sections), there are very few letters known to survive for her between her first letter in 1503 and the Battle of Flodden in 1513.
This is relative to idiolects considered synchronically rather than diachronically.
For this reason Turell (2010) considers that the term idiolect is not suitable in the field of forensic linguistics and proposes the term idiolectal style, defined as the particular way in which an individual uses a linguistic system shared by many people, considering that each person uses his/her language in a distinctive way, and it is this personal style that is relevant to forensic linguistics.
In his idiolect, we need an environment in which negative reinforcers are replaced by positive (p.
The measure of success in renewing language, according to Steiner, lies in the extent to which these experiments maintain a balance between a hermetic and untranslatable idiolect on the one hand, and the cliched communal shared forms of language on the other.
His theatre gives priority to dialogue, a characteristic feature of theatre as literature, and his characters breathe their lives through their idiolects, marked by speech acts, implicatures and polyphonic utterances.
As odd as it sounds, then, every analysand must learn to translate, and then finally to speak, his own idiolect.
24) On the subject of authorial idiolect, see Hayden White.
346); yet Maria also possesses an uncanny ability to imitate Olivia's idiolect.
It's all yours now Laurie," Higgy intones in his faux-jovial Lancastrian-lite idiolect.
In his characteristically shrill and uncouth idiolect, Adorno denounced Sibelius as representing "Aunt Jemima's ready-mix for pancakes extended to the field of music.