Idiolect


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Idiolect

 

(also called individual language), the linguistic habits of a given individual in a particular time period. Such linguistic phenomena as the various speech communities— professional, social, and territorial dialects and jargons—are formed on the basis of the aggregate of idiolects unified by a relationship of mutual comprehension. The idiolect is a conventional concept, since the same person, as a rule, uses different linguistic means in different situations of communication. Researchers in logopedics are investigating the individual idiolects of aphasiacs.

References in periodicals archive ?
There are two other clear cases where Daphne's idiolect intersects with the narratorial style.
4) For that reason the results of the 2006 analysis are in some places more reliant on idiolects.
There is no cognitive basis for thinking that the single-word concordance indexes the idiolect of an author.
investigating idiolect and youth sociolect takes Catherine Tate's insufferable Lauren's idiolect as its starting point but its analysis frame could be adapted for almost any transcript.
The latter meaning of the word "property" is understood to be the predominant one in modern English usage while the former, the right to or over something, is considered as a mere technical term, part of lawyerly idiolect.
Mustanoja 1960 and Janecka 2007 on Dan Michel's idiolect (17)).
The twofold Occasional Work and Seven Walks meshes the historical research typical of XEclogue and Debbie: An Epic and the registry of an immediate meteorological idiolect tackled by The Weather; prose receives both the poet's correspondent rhetorical registers: anthemic and ambient, redeeming the sentence and the constative mode along with it, generating luscious microchronicles of the mediated--and mediating--landscape.
subset]], born in 1962, whose idiolect she states is typical of [San.
Of the two possibilities that we suggested above to explain the deviant responses of this subject to the syllabification task: that his idiolect differs in this respect from that of the other speakers or that he is in some sense "deaf" to the contrast, it appears that the second explanation is the correct one.
The most likely explanation is that his speaker's idiolect indeed had no opposition of the two types.
He is currently undertaking studies of Shakespeare's idiolect with the Early Modern English Dictionaries Database and TACT, computer tools he is developing.
In other structures the opposition of long and short vowels is generally preserved but it can be lost in some forms of a particular idiolect.