Idiomatics


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Idiomatics

 

the aggregate of lexical idoms; also, the division of linguistics in which lexical-grammatical structure, the nature of meaning, and the syntactic and expressive-stylistic properties of idioms as specific units of language are studied.

References in periodicals archive ?
The relevant idiomatic phrases are to put a FACE to suit the occasion, to put a good FACE on something, and to make a good/great FACE.
In terms of chronology, most face-based idiomatic expressions linked semantically to the conceptual category ATTITUDES are 20th century innovations, and these are found in numerous contemporary 20th - 21st century lexicographic works.
Here, compare the English idiomatic expression to pull/make/wear a long FACE with the French equivalent faire un visage long, allonger le VISAGE ('face'), Italian idiom avere il VISO ('face') lungo, fare la FACCIA ('face') lunga and the three German idioms ein langes GESICHT ('face') machen, ein langes GESICHT ('face') ziehen, mit einem langen GESICHT ('face') wieder abziehen (9) It seems that the idiomatic sense discussed here rests on the notion that long may imply 'sad', although long does not need to be overtly present in the structure of the phraseological formation.
It needs to be pointed out that some of the ATTITUDES-related idiomatic senses have counterparts in various European languages.
The Brand Idiomatics Consumption Context Index published quarterly, benchmarks and tracks changes in consumer outlook, values, behaviors and purchases.
The Q3 '08 BI Consumption Context Index will be available on the Brand Idiomatics web site by September 30th.
Since opening its doors in Bucks County, PA, a bedroom community for the New York advertising community, Brand Idiomatics has been tapped by a number of regional and national agency and consumer brands to support 2009 strategic planning efforts.
Summing up Brand Idiomatic's potential impact, Melnick says, "Brand Idiomatics represents the transition from targeting humans as consumers, to understanding consumers as humans.
In order to avoid this, teachers should pay attention to the idiomatic performance of their pupils from the very beginning.
Let us understand that now we are in the sphere of primarily lexical idiomaticity, and therefore we refer to idiomatic expressions.
Generally though, we are convinced that there are no sharp, clear-cut boundaries between free combinations and idiomatic expressions, the latter category being represented by collocations and idioms proper.
The synchronic approach does not easily allow for an extreme view assuming that everything in language is idiomatic, and so learners will not know how to say it, or what it means, or whether it is a conventional thing to say, even if they know the grammar and the vocabulary of the language.