Ieyasu


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Ieyasu

(Ieyasu Tokugawa) (ēā`yäso͞o tōko͞ogä`wə), 1542–1616, Japanese warrior and dictator. A gifted leader and brilliant general, he founded the TokugawaTokugawa
, family that held the shogunate (see shogun) and controlled Japan from 1603 to 1867. Founded by Ieyasu, the Tokugawa regime was a centralized feudalism. The Tokugawa themselves held approximately one fourth of the country in strategically located parcels, which they
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 shogunate. Early in his career he helped NobunagaNobunaga
(Nobunaga Oda) , 1534–82, Japanese military commander. The son of a daimyo, Nobunaga greatly expanded his father's holdings, becoming master of three provinces near present-day Nagoya.
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 and HideyoshiHideyoshi
(Hideyoshi Toyotomi) , 1536–98, Japanese warrior and dictator. He entered the service of Nobunaga as his sandal holder and rose to become his leading general. After Nobunaga's death Hideyoshi ruled as civilian dictator.
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 unify Japan. In 1590 he received the area surrounding Edo (Tokyo) in fief, and he later made Edo his capital. After Hideyoshi's death (1598), he became the most powerful daimyo by defeating rival barons in the battle of Sekigahara (1600). He became shogun in 1603, made his son Hidetada nominal ruler in 1605, subdued Hideyoshi's heirs in 1615, and at his death in 1616 was the undisputed dictator of Japan. He sought to perpetuate the supremacy of his family by freezing the status quo. Under his regime attendance at the shogunal court was compulsory, castle building was strictly controlled, and Confucianism was revived to strengthen the state. Like Hideyoshi, he encouraged foreign trade; Japanese vessels carried goods to China, the Philippines, and Mexico. Christians were at first tolerated because he wished to trade with Europe. After Ieyasu's death a great mausoleum was erected in his honor at Nikko, which became one of the most important shrines in Japan. His name also appears as Iyeyasu.

Iyeyasu

, Ieyasu
Tokugawa . 1542--1616, Japanese general and statesman; founder of the Tokugawa shogunate (1603--1867)
References in periodicals archive ?
To mark the 400th anniversary of the passing of shogun Tokugawa Ieyasu who established the Edo shogunate in 1603, the city will hold a two-day special program during the festival to showcase a night-time "Grand Spectacle Show" by the globally famous "Theater Tol" at the Sumpu Castle Park.
Tokugawa Ieyasu was known for his use of shinobi against his own forces.
Ieyasu, their first Shogun, keen on trading with overseas countries, secretly ordered the Shimazus to conquer Ryukyu (now Okinawa)--an independent country with diplomatic links with China and Korea.
of Maryland, Baltimore County) covers aspects of life in this seminal period from before when warring Japanese states were unified under Tokugawa Ieyasu to just prior to the opening of Japan to the West.
Anjin: The Shogun and the English Samurai" is a drama about Adams' friendship with Japan's first Shogun, Tokugawa Ieyasu.
The Western lords felt that they had not suffered dishonour in defeat and indeed, the dishonour lay on the side of the victors for Tokugawa Ieyasu had won the great battle through treachery.
More specifically, Christians accessed wealth and weapons from overseas and attempted to form an alliance of Christian daimyd making the rulers, such as Toyotomi Hideyoshi and Tokugawa Ieyasu, feel threatened.
Stephen Turnbull's TOKUGAWA IEYASU (9781849085748, $18.
He arrived at a pivotal moment in Japanese history, and became close to the Shogun, Tokugawa Ieyasu.
This docu-drama reveals key moments Ieyasu, who was the shogunate the life of Tokugawa of founder of the Tokugawa Japan, which ruled from the Battle of in 1600 until the Meiji a Sekigahara in 1868.
Beginning from the mid-sixteenth century, Japan was vastly transformed by the "three unifiers" of medieval Japan--Nobunaga Oda, who unified Japan through military force; Hideyoshi Toyotomi, who established the fundamental governance policies that followed unification; and Ieyasu Tokugawa, who, together with his successors, sustained and adapted these structures to last for 260 years.
The danka system originated in the evolving policies of Tokugawa Ieyasu, the first Tokugawa shogun, and his predecessors and successors, toward Christianity.