Ieyasu


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Ieyasu

(Ieyasu Tokugawa) (ēā`yäso͞o tōko͞ogä`wə), 1542–1616, Japanese warrior and dictator. A gifted leader and brilliant general, he founded the TokugawaTokugawa
, family that held the shogunate (see shogun) and controlled Japan from 1603 to 1867. Founded by Ieyasu, the Tokugawa regime was a centralized feudalism. The Tokugawa themselves held approximately one fourth of the country in strategically located parcels, which they
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 shogunate. Early in his career he helped NobunagaNobunaga
(Nobunaga Oda) , 1534–82, Japanese military commander. The son of a daimyo, Nobunaga greatly expanded his father's holdings, becoming master of three provinces near present-day Nagoya.
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 and HideyoshiHideyoshi
(Hideyoshi Toyotomi) , 1536–98, Japanese warrior and dictator. He entered the service of Nobunaga as his sandal holder and rose to become his leading general. After Nobunaga's death Hideyoshi ruled as civilian dictator.
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 unify Japan. In 1590 he received the area surrounding Edo (Tokyo) in fief, and he later made Edo his capital. After Hideyoshi's death (1598), he became the most powerful daimyo by defeating rival barons in the battle of Sekigahara (1600). He became shogun in 1603, made his son Hidetada nominal ruler in 1605, subdued Hideyoshi's heirs in 1615, and at his death in 1616 was the undisputed dictator of Japan. He sought to perpetuate the supremacy of his family by freezing the status quo. Under his regime attendance at the shogunal court was compulsory, castle building was strictly controlled, and Confucianism was revived to strengthen the state. Like Hideyoshi, he encouraged foreign trade; Japanese vessels carried goods to China, the Philippines, and Mexico. Christians were at first tolerated because he wished to trade with Europe. After Ieyasu's death a great mausoleum was erected in his honor at Nikko, which became one of the most important shrines in Japan. His name also appears as Iyeyasu.

Iyeyasu

, Ieyasu
Tokugawa . 1542--1616, Japanese general and statesman; founder of the Tokugawa shogunate (1603--1867)
References in periodicals archive ?
Tokugawa Ieyasu (1542-1616) was the military leader who completed the reunification of Japan after more than a century of civil war and then restored for himself at the central governing position of shogun which was effectively a military dictator.
Tokugawa Ieyasu (1542-1616) permitiu o comercio com estrangeiros mas proibiu a propagacao de ideias cristas no Japao ao perceber que os portugueses e espanhois estavam mais interessados em evangelizar as elites feudais do que estabelecer relacoes comerciais.
Ieyasu feared Takayama and was quoted as having said: 'In Ukon's hands 1,000 soldiers would be worth more than 10,000 in the hands of whosoever else.
Stephen Turnbull's TOKUGAWA IEYASU (9781849085748, $18.
For those who don't know Japanese history, Oda Nobunaga was a warlord who almost managed to unify Japan in the late sixteenth century; he was defeated by one of his generals, Akechi Mitsuhide, who was then defeated by Toyotomi Hideyoshi (who in turn was defeated by Tokugawa Ieyasu in 1600, who started the long line of Shoguns who ruled Japan until the mid-nineteenth century).
He arrived at a pivotal moment in Japanese history, and became close to the Shogun, Tokugawa Ieyasu.
Numerous undocumented earthquakes and fires occurred in addition to the documented fires of 1600 and 1614, when Tokugawa Ieyasu [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (1543-1616) laid siege to Toyotomi Hideyori's [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (1593-1615) forces at Osaka castle.
This docu-drama reveals key moments Ieyasu, who was the shogunate the life of Tokugawa of founder of the Tokugawa Japan, which ruled from the Battle of in 1600 until the Meiji a Sekigahara in 1868.
They also produced a copy of a license from the first Edo Shogun, Ieyasu, giving them the exclusive right to solicit alms by means of shakuhachi playing.
Beginning from the mid-sixteenth century, Japan was vastly transformed by the "three unifiers" of medieval Japan--Nobunaga Oda, who unified Japan through military force; Hideyoshi Toyotomi, who established the fundamental governance policies that followed unification; and Ieyasu Tokugawa, who, together with his successors, sustained and adapted these structures to last for 260 years.
The danka system originated in the evolving policies of Tokugawa Ieyasu, the first Tokugawa shogun, and his predecessors and successors, toward Christianity.