Ignatius Loyola

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Ignatius Loyola

Saint. 1491--1556, Spanish ecclesiastic. He founded the Society of Jesus (1534) and was its first general (1541--56). His Spiritual Exercises (1548) remains the basic manual for the training of Jesuits. Feast day: July 31
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Saint Ignatius of Loyola said there is "no greater mistake in spiritual matters than to force others to follow one's own pattern.
Ignatius of Loyola, rooted in the Renaissance, is being transmitted in the electronic age via a three-part video series made at St.
Thus, topics that deserve more nuance are treated only cursorily: chapter 3 attempts a history of Catholic mysticism in 20 pages, devoting one paragraph each to Augustine and Ignatius of Loyola (22, 27); discussions of "the Eucharist" and "contemplation" (43, 52) in chapter 4 are too brief.
If you have been hurt by "the church," meaning only some priests and bishops, remember, as Budd Schulberg points out in On the Waterfront, that Saint Basil was accused of heresy before Pope Damascus, Saint Cyril was condemned by a council of 40 bishops, Saint Joan of Arc was burned at the stake, and Saint Ignatius of Loyola was imprisoned by the Inquisition.
Ignatius of Loyola rediscovered for the church the centrality of the apostolic spirituality that St.
Ignatius of Loyola, cofounder and first father general of the Society of Jesus, once wrote that he "would prefer face-to-face encounters to a lot of letter writing" (7).
Also receiving more than one vote were Saints Thomas the Apostle, Thomas More, John of the Cross, Thomas Aquinas, Ignatius of Loyola, Patrick, and Bernadette.
DESCRIPTION: "Spain: In the Footsteps of Teresa of Avila, John of the Cross and Ignatius of Loyola," May 25-Jun 6.
With incredible honesty Noonan records both the inevitable progress of the disease and what Ignatius of Loyola calls the inevitability of prayer as he is brought to that place where one cannot but pray.
draws heavily from Paul whose experience of the Spirit he considers paradigmatic, and from theologians and mystics such as Irenaeus, Basil of Caesarea, Augustine, Teresa of Avila, John of the Cross, Ignatius of Loyola, Louis Bouyer, Serge Boulgakov, Hans Urs von Balthasar, and Yves Congar.
Saint Ignatius of Loyola was converted after reading a book about the saints.