Ihimaera


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Ihimaera

Witi , full name Witi Tame Ihimaera-Smiler. born 1944, New Zealand Maori novelist and short-story writer; his novels include The Whale Rider (1987) and The Uncle's Story (2002)
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For Ihimaera the courthouse encounter affected him deeply: "That scene is exactly as it happened.
Whale Rider's utopian storyline was a hit with cinema audiences worldwide, and Ihimaera commended the way Caro
La realizadora cuenta a Proceso que Mentiras blancas esta basada en la novela Medicine Woman (Curandera) del escritor maori Witi Ihimaera (Gisborne, 1944).
The Banff Centre is the only Indigenous Arts incubator in the world that works at a high academic level," said Ihimaera.
Via their readings of Ihimaera and Hulme, D'Cruz Ross conclude that both authors promote the urgent need for Maori to recover their own heritage as a source of strength when negotiating their ambivalent position in contemporary New Zealand.
Doctorow and Jonathan Franzen; the Italian novel has Umberto Eco; the German novel has Gunter Grass; the Canadian novel has Margaret Atwood; the Chinese novel has a number of energetic small fry; the Australian novel has Peter Carey, Thomas Keneally, Tim Winton, David Malouf and Murray Bail; the New Zealand novel has Lloyd Jones and Charlotte Randall; the Samoan novel has Albert Wendt and the Maori novel has third rate Witi Ihimaera.
He has crossed swords or fallen out with Albert Wendt, Witi Ihimaera, Alistair Paterson, Louis Johnson, Lauris Edmond and the whole motley crew of the Wellington literary mafia, who are as narrow minded as the Spanish Inquisi-tion (especially about the truth) and who have no hesitation in applying unspeakable literary torture to obtain confession of that most heinous of literary sins--that of being an Auck-lander, especially one who possesses literary talent.
One of the highlights for me, and there were many, came when I met Witi Ihimaera, the author of Whale Rider.
In November 2009, the New Zealand literary world was convulsed in the manner peculiar to literary worlds by the revelation that Witi Ihimaera, the prominent Maori novelist and Academician, was guilty of plagiarism in his most recent novel, The Trowenna Sea, which tells the story of Hohepa Te Umuroa (c.
Striding both worlds; Witi Ihimaera with New Zealand's literary traditions.
The reasons for this are to be sought in the highly personal style of prose employed, the gripping story told and, foremost, the uninhibited treatment of controversial subject matter, perceived as "a kick in the guts to New Zealand's much vaunted pride in its Maori-Pakeha [non-Maori] race relations" (Witi Ihimaera in Thompson 1999: 166).
Ihimaera avoids the absolute compartmentalization of colonial images of the Aborigine and Indigenous resistance writing by including stories by Pakeha and Maori authors in a single anthology.