Ijo


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Ijo

 

(also Ijaw; self-designation, Ije), a people living in southern Nigeria in the delta of the Niger River. Population, approximately 800,000 (1967 estimate). The Ijo’s language is conventionally attributed to the Guinean group of languages. The majority of the Ijo are Christians, but some retain the local traditional beliefs. At the beginning of the 15th century, the Ijo founded the city of Bonny, which was one of the centers of the slave trade in West Africa. The principal occupations are tropical agriculture (yams, manioc, and sweet potato), gathering the fruit of the oil palm, and fishing.

References in periodicals archive ?
Articles in IJO (Table 4) were more likely to use the term "famine" to refer to food shortage/insecurity (29.
In the wake of the attack, the IJO quickly claimed[credit], threatening that "the earth will tremble unless the MNF leaves Lebanon by New Year's Day 1984'.
And, even when I was by myself, there are other members of the IJO who would offer advice and opinions.
Nevertheless, however committed Hizb Allah was to carrying out such attacks, the IJO was not up to the task.
Uncircumcised women can not be buried in the town land since the Ijo believe that this will cause the fertility of the earth to diminish.
In my opinion, the three that best fit the bill are: 'Forms of Ivri', by Philip Peek, 'The Dancing People: Eastern Ijo Masking Traditions', by Martha Anderson, and 'Obolo Arts', by Keith Nicklin.
However, the IJO collection of the jute germplasm has remained untested.
A Reed in the Tide (1965), which contains most of his earlier Poems of 1963, blazed the trail of a poetry which gradually sheds Western influences to establish a unique poetic voice that incorporates the oral traditions of his Ijo and Urhobo people.
In that situation, (southwestern dialects of) Dutch and one or several Eastern lects of the Ijo languages (members of the Ijoid branch within Niger-Congo) were the dominant languages present (see Smith et al.
Ce creole (s'il en est un(16)) se serait developpe dans des conditions ou la presence ijo aurait ete tant primaire que dominante, selon les auteurs.
Cassandra, the young girl with the heavily prophetic name, the captive Trojan princess, reappears in the stories of Oleta and Queen Ijo, as well as in the tributes to such icons of African American womanhood as Marian Anderson, Josephine Baker, and the primitive artist of power and vision Minnie Evans, the gatekeeper of Airlie Gardens.