illusory correlation

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illusory correlation

[i‚lü·zə·rē ‚kä·rə′lā·shən]
(statistics)
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the formation of illusory correlations (or perceptions of an association between two variables that are objectively uncorrelated)--presented yet another possible relationship between bias and the thoroughness of processing.
Illusory correlations can develop for a variety of reasons, but one often examined and widely replicated factor is the co-occurrence of distinctive stimuli (e.
Hamilton and Gifford (1976) were the first to demonstrate the role of distinctiveness-based illusory correlations in the formation of stereotypes.
Distinctiveness-based illusory correlations have been of great interest in part because of their implications for the formation of social stereotypes (Hamilton & Sherman, 1989).
Distinctiveness-based illusory correlations and stereotyping: A meta-analytic integration.
Illusory correlation and the maintenance of stereotypic beliefs.
Having no expectations concerning differences between the groups did not result in significant differences in illusory correlations between the traditional and weak intergroup instruction (assignment task: F(1,89) = 2.
The fact that stimulus groups simply identified by A and B help to create expectations about differences between them is ironic, because the group labels A and B were originally used with the intention of eliminating expectations associated with real groups which might otherwise explain illusory correlations (see Hamilton & Rose, 1980).
In line with the first study, we expect that any emphasis on the group dimension will stimulate comparison between the stimulus groups, resulting in stronger illusory correlations.
We predict stronger illusory correlations in the group-prominent condition than in the behaviour-prominent and standard conditions, and stronger illusory correlations in the standard than in the behaviour-prominent condition.
While what they do might well be valid, how they say it when consciously reconstructing it often takes the form of illusory correlations, errors of cause-effect interpretations, or generalization beyond the bounds of their experience.
The author explains that because of various cognitive biases and illusions, such as hindsight bias, illusory correlations, etc.