Ilokano


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Ilokano

 

(also Iloki), a people living primarily on the western coast of the island of Luzon in the Philippines, as well as in the valley of the Cagayan River and the coastal regions of the island of Mindanao. Some Ilokano live outside the Philippines—in the Hawaiian Islands, on the island of Guam, and in California. The Ilokano number about 4.5 million (1970, estimate). Their language belongs to the Indonesian language group. They profess Christianity (Catholicism and Aglipayanism, a local Protestant doctrine), but vestiges of their pre-Christian beliefs remain. The principal occupation is agriculture aided by irrigation (rice, corn, yams, sugarcane, tobacco, cotton, and other crops); the Ilokano also raise buffalo, swine, and chickens. Handicrafts developed by the Ilokano include cotton quilting and making articles from gold, shell, and ebony.

REFERENCE

Narody Iugo-Vostochnoi Azii. Moscow, 1966.
References in periodicals archive ?
6) Ilokano adjective intensifying prefix selects for a doubled stem (Rubino 2001)
KOLONIA Federated States of Micronesia ILOKANO (Web2), OOLIKAN (OED oolakan 1953q)
In Ilokano, the language spoken in the northwestern provinces, the suggested word was kabaw, which is apparently quite broad and can be used in reference to someone who is forgetful, retarded, or otherwise impaired mentally.
While she conveys well the fragmented sense of self resulting from insertion into alienating and racist labour regimes, her argument is overly predicated on a romanticised version of Ilokano masculinity as a 'seamless whole' valorising 'intimacy' and 'trust' which is then shattered by the disjunctures of late-stage industrial capital.
But for the Ilocanos based in Qatar, besides these common associations, they are keen on being known and making a mark in the community through their various initiatives geared towards brotherhood and extending a helping hand to their other compatriots regardless of ethnicity through the organisation Confederation of Ilocano Association Inc or Samahang Ilokano 61892 Qatar Chapter.
One such borrowing is given by Blust (2010) for Ilokano olimaw 'winged serpent; imaginary creature' "with semantic change due to the inevitably speculative character of a gloss that was understandable to Malays, who were familiar with tigers and leopards, but not to peoples of the northern Philippines, who were not.
The mapped causee condition was also intended to deal with the difference between languages like Halkomelem, where the causee links, and languages like Ilokano, where the patient links.